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The wage effects of cumulative job mobility

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Author Info

  • Kristen Keith
  • Abagail McWilliams

Abstract

This analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth shows that cumulative job mobility had statistically significant effects on wages in the years 1979-88. The direction of the wage effects (positive or negative) and their magnitude varied depending on the type of cumulative mobility examined: employee-initiated versus employer-initiated separations, economic versus family-related quits, layoffs versus discharges. The results also indicate that although men and women had different mobility histories-men, for example, had been discharged more often than women, and women had quit for family-related reasons more often than men-the wage effects of each type of cumulative mobility (economic quits, family-related quits, layoffs, and discharges) were similar for men and women. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 49 (1995)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 121-137

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:49:y:1995:i:1:p:121-137

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Cited by:
  1. Joyce Burnette, 2011. "The Emergence of Wage Discrimination in U.S. Manufacturing," Working Papers 11-18, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. Borghans, Lex & Golsteyn, Bart H.H., 2010. "Job Mobility in Europe, Japan and the U.S," IZA Discussion Papers 5386, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Wagner, Alexander F, 2011. "Relational contracts when the agent's productivity inside the relationship is correlated with outside opportunities," CEPR Discussion Papers 8378, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Kauhanen, Antti & Napari, Sami, 2011. "Gender Differences in Careers," Discussion Papers 1241, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  5. Semykina, Anastasia & Linz, Susan J., 2007. "Gender differences in personality and earnings: Evidence from Russia," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 387-410, June.
  6. Miguel A. Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2003. "Long-Term Effects Of Involuntary Job Separations On Labour Careers," Business Economics Working Papers wb034211, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  7. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Ricardo Serrano-Padial, 2006. "Wage Growth Implications of Fixed-Term Employment: An Analysis by Contract Duration and Job Mobility," Working Papers 0016, San Diego State University, Department of Economics.
  8. Eryar, Değer & Tekgüç, Hasan, 2013. "Gender effect in explaining the mobility patterns in the labor market: a Case study from Turkey," MPRA Paper 46006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Theodossiou, I. & Zangelidis, A., 2009. "Should I stay or should I go? The effect of gender, education and unemployment on labour market transitions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 566-577, October.
  10. Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Tenure and Personal Contacts: Good Matches or Limited Choices?," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0417, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  11. Miguel Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2008. "Women’s family-related career breaks: a long-term British perspective," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 127-167, June.

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