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Sources of training and their impact on wages

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  • Jonathan R. Veum
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    Abstract

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth from 1986 to 1990, the author investigates the wage impact of various sources of training-among them, company training programs, apprenticeships, business schools, vocational and technical institutes, correspondence courses, and seminars outside the workplace. Time spent in training (of whatever kind) apparently did not affect 1990 wage levels. The incidence of two kinds of training, however-company training and seminars outside work-was positively related to wage levels as well as to wage change between 1986 and 1990; that is, workers who undertook such training enjoyed higher wages than those who did not. Time spent in vocational schools was also positively associated with wage change, though not with 1990 wage levels. The other forms of training had no apparent impact on either wage levels or wage change. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

    Volume (Year): 48 (1995)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 812-826

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    Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:48:y:1995:i:4:p:812-826

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    Cited by:
    1. Katrin Breuer & Patrick Kampkoetter, 2012. "Do Employees Reciprocate to Intra-Firm Trainings? An Analysis of Absenteeism and Turnover Rates," Cologne Graduate School Working Paper Series 03-09, Cologne Graduate School in Management, Economics and Social Sciences.
    2. Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Snower, Dennis J., 2012. "Institutions and training inequality," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 88-104.
    3. Anna Ruzik-Sierdzinska & Claudia Villosio & Michele Belloni & Maciej Lis & Monika Potoczna, 2013. "Age and productivity. Human Capital Accumulation and Depreciation," CASE Network Reports 0114, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Dostie, Benoit & Léger, Pierre Thomas, 2011. "Firm-Sponsored Classroom Training: Is It Worth It for Older Workers?," IZA Discussion Papers 6123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Christophe Muller & Christophe J. Nordman, 2012. "Wages and On-the-Job Training in Tunisia," AMSE Working Papers 1222, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
    6. Feng, Shuaizhang, 2009. "Return to Training and Establishment Size: A Reexamination of the Size-Wage Puzzle," IZA Discussion Papers 4143, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Hill, Elizabeth T., 2001. "Post-school-age training among women: training methods and labor market outcomes at older ages," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 181-191, April.
    8. Berger, Mark C. & Earle, John S. & Peter, Klara Sabirianova, 2001. "Worker Training in a Restructuring Economy: Evidence from the Russian Transition," IZA Discussion Papers 361, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Einarsson, T. & Marquis, M.H., 1996. "Formal Training, On-the-Job Training and the Allocation of Time," Working Papers 1996_06_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    10. Christopher Dougherty, 2000. "Impact of work experience and training in the current and previous occupations on earnings: micro evidence from the national longitudinal survey of youth," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20189, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Zoega, Gylfi, 2003. "Unions, Work-Related Training, and Wages: Evidence for British Men," IZA Discussion Papers 737, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Edwin Leuven & Hessel Oosterbeek, 2002. "A New Approach to estimate the Wage Returns to Work-related Training," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-091/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Brunello, Giorgio & Comi, Simona Lorena & Sonedda, Daniela, 2012. "Training subsidies and the wage returns to continuing vocational training," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 361-372.
    14. Ross Miller & Masanori Hashimoto, 1997. "How Do Training And Early Labor Market Experience Affect The Economic Well-Being Of Youths?," Working Papers 009, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
    15. Ng, Ying Chu, 2005. "Training determinants and productivity impact of training in China: a case of Shanghai," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 275-295, June.

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