Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The effects of tastes and motivation on individual income

Contents:

Author Info

  • James E. Long
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The author examines the relationship between income and certain tastes and motivation factors using data from a national sample of individuals interviewed as college freshmen in 1971 and then surveyed nine years later. He finds that respondents' drive to achieve and the importance they attached to financial success were positively related to annual income. The extent to which raising a family was valued as a goal did not affect income, at least for full-time workers. The estimated income effects of these tastes and motivation factors vary by gender. For example, a strong desire for financial well-being enhanced income more for men than for women. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

    Volume (Year): 48 (1995)
    Issue (Month): 2 (January)
    Pages: 338-351

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:48:y:1995:i:2:p:338-351

    Contact details of provider:
    Fax: 607-255-8016
    Web page: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Postal: 381 Ives East, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-3901
    Email:
    Web: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Paarsch, Harry J. & Shearer, Bruce S., 2004. "Male-Female Productivity Differentials: the Role of Ability and Incentives," Cahiers de recherche 0401, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    2. Georgellis, Yannis & Gregoriou, Andros & Tsitsianis, Nikolaos, 2008. "Adaptation towards reference values: A non-linear perspective," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 67(3-4), pages 768-781, September.
    3. Harry J. Paarsch & Bruce S. Shearer, 2004. "Male-Female Productivity Differentials: the Role of Ability and Incentives (revised)," Cahiers de recherche 0410, CIRPEE.
    4. Palifka, Bonnie J., 2009. "Personality and income in Mexico: Supervisor assessments vs. self-assessments," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 92-106, February.
    5. Hussey, Andrew, 2011. "The effect of ethics on labor market success: Evidence from MBAs," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 168-180.
    6. Carol Nickerson & Norbert Schwarz & Ed Diener, 2007. "Financial aspirations, financial success, and overall life satisfaction: who? and how?," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 467-515, December.
    7. Olbrecht, Alexandre, 2009. "Do academically deficient scholarship athletes earn higher wages subsequent to graduation?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 611-619, October.
    8. Hilmer, Michael J. & Hilmer, Christiana E., 2012. "On the relationship between student tastes and motivations, higher education decisions, and annual earnings," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 66-75.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:48:y:1995:i:2:p:338-351. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ILR Review).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.