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Gender discrimination by gender: Voting in a professional society

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Author Info

  • Alan E. Dillingham
  • Daniel Hamermesh
  • Marianne Ferber

Abstract

Although most economic theories of discrimination hypothesize that discrimination stems from people's discriminatory tastes, no empirical study of the labor market has examined tastes for discrimination directly or considered people's willingness to trade off other preferences to indulge their tastes for discrimination. The authors study this trade-off using a set of data on votes for officers in a professional association in 1989 and 1990. They find that female voters were much more likely to vote for female than for male candidates, and that other affinities between them and a candidate had little effect on their choices. Male voters, in contrast, were indifferent to the candidates' gender, and their choices were easily altered by other affinities to a candidate. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 47 (1994)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 622-633

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:47:y:1994:i:4:p:622-633

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Cited by:
  1. Berggren, Niclas & Jordahl, Henrik & Poutvaara, Panu, 2006. "The Looks of a Winner: Beauty, Gender and Electoral Success," Ratio Working Papers, The Ratio Institute 104, The Ratio Institute.
  2. Bagues, Manuel & Perez-Villadoniga, Maria J., 2012. "Do recruiters prefer applicants with similar skills? Evidence from a randomized natural experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 12-20.
  3. Illong Kwon & Eva Meyersson Milgrom, 2010. "Working for Female Managers: Gender Hierarchy in the Workplace," Discussion Papers, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research 10-012, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  4. Feld, Jan & Salamanca, Nicolás & Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2014. "Endophilia or Exophobia: Beyond Discrimination," Working Papers in Economics 593, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  5. Jason Abrevaya & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2012. "Charity and Favoritism in the Field: Are Female Economists Nicer (To Each Other)?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(1), pages 202-207, February.
  6. Manuel F. Bagüés & Berta Esteve-Volart, 2007. "Can gender parity break the glass ceiling? Evidence from a repeated randomized experiment," Working Papers 2007-15, FEDEA.
  7. Hamermesh, Daniel S & Biddle, Jeff E, 1994. "Beauty and the Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1174-94, December.
  8. Stephen Donald & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2004. "What is Discrimination? Gender in the American Economic Association," NBER Working Papers 10684, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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