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Changing the Social Security rules for work after age 65

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Author Info

  • Alan L. Gustman
  • Thomas L. Steinmeier

Abstract

This paper simulates the effects of proposed changes in the social security rules, including the elimination of the Retirement Earnings Test, for men who work after normal retirement age. A policy change that was given serious consideration by the Social Security Administration in 1988-89 (and that is similar to other proposals made in Congress and elsewhere since then) is projected to raise long-run costs by $43 billion net of taxes and to induce an increase of 3.5% in the number of full-time male workers between the ages of 65 and 69. The outcome, especially in the short run, is greatly affected by the timing of workers' decisions to apply for benefits. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 44 (1991)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 733-745

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:44:y:1991:i:4:p:733-745

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Cited by:
  1. Song, Jae G. & Manchester, Joyce, 2007. "New evidence on earnings and benefit claims following changes in the retirement earnings test in 2000," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(3-4), pages 669-700, April.
  2. David S. Loughran & Steven Haider, 2007. "Do the Elderly Respond to Taxes on Earnings? Evidence from the Social Security Retirement Earnings Test," Working Papers 223-1, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
  3. Phillip B. Levine & Olivia S. Mitchell, 1991. "Expected Changes in the Workforce and Implications for Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 3743, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1994. "Employer-provided health insurance and retirement behavior," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(1), pages 124-140, October.
  5. Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne, 1999. "How do retirement tests affect the labour supply of older men?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 27-51, January.
  6. Leora Friedberg, 2000. "The Labor Supply Effects of the Social Security Earnings Test," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 48-63, February.
  7. Stephen Rubb, 2003. "Social Security's Earnings Test Penalty and the Employment Rates of Elderly Men Aged 65 to 69," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 415-431, Summer.
  8. David Neumark & Elizabeth Powers, 1996. "Consequences of means testing Social Security: evidence from the SSI program," Working Paper 9618, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

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