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Wages, nonwage job characteristics, and labor mobility

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  • Ann P. Bartel
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the effects of a set of nonwage job characteristics on the quit decisions of young and middle-aged men. The data set was constructed by merging data in the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young and Mature Men with data from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles file and the Bureau of Economic Analysis file on fringe benefits. The empirical analysis shows that some nonwage job attributes have significant influence on worker quit behavior and that there are important differences in the effects of the nonwage job characteristics across age groups. Young men are significantly more likely than older men to quit repetitive jobs, for example, whereas the presence of bad working conditions is a more important factor in the quit decisions of the older cohort. The results also indicate that, for the older men, fringe benefits have a stronger effect on quit decisions than wages do. Further evidence on age differences is provided through an analysis of panel data from the Quality of Employment Survey. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

    Volume (Year): 35 (1982)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 578-589

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    Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:35:y:1982:i:4:p:578-589

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    Cited by:
    1. Ommeren, Jos van & Berg, Gerard J. van den & Gorter, Cees, 1998. "Estimating the marginal willingness to pay for commuting," Serie Research Memoranda 0046, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    2. Cottini, Elena & Kato, Takao & WestergĂĄrd-Nielsen, Niels C., 2009. "Adverse Workplace Conditions, High-Involvement Work Practices and Labor Turnover: Evidence from Danish Linked Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 4587, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Ibsen, Rikke & Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels, 2005. "Job Creation and Destruction over the Business Cycles and the Impact on Individual Job Flows in Denmark 1980-2001," Working Papers 05-4, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    4. Alan Manning & Joanna Swaffield, 2008. "The gender gap in early-career wage growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 983-1024, 07.
    5. Klein, Roger & Spady, Richard & Weiss, Andrew, 1991. "Factors Affecting the Output and Quit Propensities of Production Workers," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(5), pages 929-53, October.
    6. William T. Dickens & Brian A. Ross, 1984. "Consistent Estimation Using Data From More Than One Sample," NBER Technical Working Papers 0033, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. repec:hal:cesptp:halshs-00203158 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Zanni, Alberto M. & Davidova, Sophia & Bailey, Alastair, 2006. "Analysis of Vocational and Residential Preferences of Rural Population: Application of an Experimental Technique to Rural Slovenia," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25534, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Marco Angrisani & Michael D. Hurd & Erik Meijer & Andrew M. Parker & Susann Rohwedder, 2013. "Labor Force Transitions at Older Ages: The Roles of Work Environment and Personality," Working Papers wp295, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    10. Levy-Garboua, Louis & Montmarquette, Claude & Simonnet, Veronique, 2007. "Job satisfaction and quits," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 251-268, April.
    11. Sullivan, Paul, 2007. "A Dynamic Analysis of Educational Attainment, Occupational Choices, and Job Search," MPRA Paper 4590, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Jill Marie Gunderson & Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2004. "Job separation behavior of welfare recipients: results from a unique case study," Working Paper 2004-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    13. Brigitte C. Madrian, 1993. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is There Evidence ofJob-Lock?," NBER Working Papers 4476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Josse Delfgaauw, 2005. "Where to go? Workers' Reasons to quit and Intra- versus Interindustry Job Mobility," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-027/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 08 Aug 2005.

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