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The persistence of the discouraged worker effect

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  • Stuart O. Schweitzer
  • Ralph E. Smith
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    Abstract

    Determination of the relationship between labor force and worker participation rates in the United States in the 1970s. Hypothesis as to why unemployment affects youth; Significance of work orientation for work relationships; Description of the labor participation model. (Abstract copyright EBSCO.)

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

    Volume (Year): 27 (1974)
    Issue (Month): 2 (January)
    Pages: 249-260

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    Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:27:y:1974:i:2:p:249-260

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    Cited by:
    1. Matt Jackson, 2003. "The Effects of Social Networks on Employment and Inequality," Theory workshop papers 658612000000000032, UCLA Department of Economics.
    2. Carolina Fugazza, 2012. "Employment Risk over the Life Cycle," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 280, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    3. Ozerkek, Y., 2013. "Unemployment And Labor Force Participation: A Panel Cointegration Analysis For European Countries," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 13(1), pages 67-76.
    4. Hedström, Peter & Kolm, Ann-Sofie & Åberg, Yvonne, 2003. "Social interactions and unemployment," Working Paper Series 2003:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    5. Kamila Fialová & Martina Mysíková, 2009. "Labour Market Participation: The Impact of Social Benefits in the Czech Republic and Selected European Countries," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2009(3), pages 235-250.
    6. Vendrik Maarten & Cörvers Frank, 2009. "Male and female labour force participation: the role of dynamic adjustments to changes in labour demand, government policies and autonomous trends," Research Memorandum 036, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    7. Vendrik Maarten & Cörvers Frank, 2009. "Male and female labour force participation: the role of dynamic adjustments to changes in labour demand, government policies and autonomous trends," ROA Research Memorandum 013, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    8. Furuya, Kaku, 2002. "A socio-economic model of stigma and related social problems," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 281-290, July.

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