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Is Government Expenditure Volatility Harmful for Growth? A Cross-Country Analysis

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  • Davide Furceri

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to analyse the relationship between government expenditure volatility and long-run growth. Using cross-country panel data from 1970 to 2000, the paper finds that countries with higher government expenditure business-cycle volatility have lower growth, even after controlling for other country-specific growth correlates such as investment, government expenditure, human capital, population growth and output volatility. This relation is robust to different measures of business cycles. Moreover, considering different subsamples, the paper finds that while government volatility significantly affects long-run growth for developing countries, it has a small effect for OECD countries. Copyright 2007 Institute for Fiscal Studies.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

Volume (Year): 28 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (03)
Pages: 103-120

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Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:28:y:2007:i:1:p:103-120

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Cited by:
  1. António Afonso & Luca Agnello & Davide Furceri, 2008. "Fiscal Policy Responsiveness, Persistence, and Discretion," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 659, OECD Publishing.
  2. Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2007. "Volatile public spending in a model of money and sustainable growth," Discussion Paper Series 2007_18, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Jul 2007.
  3. Agnese Sacchi & Simone Salotti, 2014. "The influence of decentralized taxes and intergovernmental grants on local spending volatility," Working Papers 1405, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
  4. Sacchi, Agnese & Salotti, Simone, 2014. "The impact of national fiscal rules on the stabilisation function of fiscal policy," MPRA Paper 56982, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Luca Agnello & Ricardo M. Sousa, 2009. "The Determinants of Public Deficit Volatility," NIPE Working Papers 11/2009, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
  6. Furceri, Davide & Sacchi, Agnese & Salotti, Simone, 2014. "Can fiscal decentralization alleviate government consumption volatility?," MPRA Paper 54513, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Afonso, António & Furceri, Davide, 2010. "Government size, composition, volatility and economic growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 517-532, December.
  8. Maria Grydaki & Stilianos Fountas, 2008. "Exchange Rate Volatility and Output Volatility: a Theoretical Approach," Discussion Paper Series 2008_16, Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, revised Dec 2008.
  9. Ahmed, Abdullahi D. & Suardi, Sandy, 2009. "Macroeconomic Volatility, Trade and Financial Liberalization in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1623-1636, October.
  10. Serhan Cevik & Katerina Teksoz, 2014. "Deep Roots of Fiscal Behavior," IMF Working Papers 14/45, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Varvarigos, Dimitrios, 2010. "Inflation, volatile public spending, and endogenously sustained growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1893-1906, October.
  12. Furceri, Davide & Poplawski Ribeiro, Marcos, 2008. "Government spending volatility and the size of nations," Working Paper Series 0924, European Central Bank.
  13. Davide Furceri & Aleksandra Zdzienicka, 2012. "Financial Integration and Fiscal Policy," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 23(5), pages 805-822, November.
  14. Carine Bouthevillain & John Caruana & Cristina Checherita & Jorge Cunha & Esther Gordo & Stephan Haroutunian & Amela Hubic & Geert Langenus & Bernhard Manzke & Javier J. Pérez & Pietro Tommasino, 2009. "Pros and Cons of various fiscal measures to stimulate the economy," BCL working papers 40, Central Bank of Luxembourg.

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