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Economic instruments to improve UK home energy efficiency without negative social impacts

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  • Simon Dresner
  • Paul Ekins
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    Abstract

    The research examined how to use economic instruments to reduce carbon emissions from the UK housing sector without causing negative impacts on the poorest households. Carbon taxes would worsen the problem of fuel poverty. Compensation mechanisms involving the tax and benefit system were examined, but found not to be entirely effective because of the enormous range in the existing energy efficiency of homes. Exemptions for low-income households were examined, but found impractical to target. It was concluded that the best way to use economic instruments was through a scheme involving energy audits and surcharges to council tax and stamp duty for homeowners who failed to make cost-effective energy efficiency improvements within a specified time, with grants and loans to assist low-income households. After the implementation of such a scheme for 10 years, it would be practical to introduce a targeted carbon tax.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

    Volume (Year): 27 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 47-74

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    Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:27:y:2006:i:1:p:47-74

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    Cited by:
    1. Meier, Helena & Rehdanz, Katrin, 2010. "Determinants of residential space heating expenditures in Great Britain," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 949-959, September.
    2. Pashardes, Panos & Pashourtidou, Nicoletta & Zachariadis, Theodoros, 2014. "Estimating welfare aspects of changes in energy prices from preference heterogeneity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 58-66.
    3. Benjamin Jones & Michael Keen & Jon Strand, 2013. "Fiscal implications of climate change," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 29-70, February.
    4. Don Fullerton & Andrew Leicester & Stephen Smith, 2008. "Environmental Taxes," NBER Working Papers 14197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Büchs, Milena & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2013. "Who emits most? Associations between socio-economic factors and UK households' home energy, transport, indirect and total CO2 emissions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 114-123.
    6. Buchs, Milena & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2013. "UK Households' Carbon Footprint: A Comparison of the Association between Household Characteristics and Emissions from Home Energy, Transport and Other Goods and Services," IZA Discussion Papers 7204, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Wyatt, Peter, 2013. "A dwelling-level investigation into the physical and socio-economic drivers of domestic energy consumption in England," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 540-549.

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