Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Carbon taxation, prices and inequality in Australia

Contents:

Author Info

  • Antonia Cornwell
  • John Creedy

Abstract

from the combustion of fossil fuels, has led to proposals for non-market mechanisms such as regulation, and market mechanisms such as tradable emissions permits and carbon taxes, in order to reduce emissions. Market methods are usually preferred in terms of efficiency, and the carbon tax is deemed as being the easiest to implement and monitor. Owen (1992, p. 4)compares carbon taxes with other instruments; Pearce (1991) provides a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of a carbon tax; and Dower and Zimmerman (1992) compare the merits of carbon taxes and tradable emissions permits. A carbon tax would affect the price of fossil fuels and thus consumer prices,both directly for fuels and indirectly for manufactured goods. These price changes would alter the levels of final demands, and therefore fossil fuel use and aggregate carbon dioxide emissions. This paper investigates the orders of magnitude of a carbon tax required to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in Australia such that the Toronto target is met; this requires a reduction in emissions of 20 per cent of 1988 levels by 2005. The paper also examines the

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/fs/articles/fscorn.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

Volume (Year): 17 (1996)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 21-38

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:17:y:1996:i:3:p:21-38

Contact details of provider:
Postal: The Institute for Fiscal Studies 7 Ridgmount Street LONDON WC1E 7AE
Phone: (+44) 020 7291 4800
Fax: (+44) 020 7323 4780
Email:
Web page: http://www.ifs.org.uk
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Postal: The Institute for Fiscal Studies 7 Ridgmount Street LONDON WC1E 7AE
Email:

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Deaton, Angus, 1974. "A Reconsideration of the Empirical Implications of Additive Preferences," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 84(334), pages 338-48, June.
  2. Kathy Hayes & Peter Lambert & Daniel Slottje, . "Evaluating Impact Effects of Tax Reforms," Discussion Papers 93/10, Department of Economics, University of York.
  3. R.A. McDougall, 1993. "Short-Run Effects of A Carbon Tax," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-100, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  4. Elizabeth Symons & John Proops & Philip Gay, 1994. "Carbon taxes, consumer demand and carbon dioxide emissions: a simulation analysis for the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(2), pages 19-43, May.
  5. Pearce, David W, 1991. "The Role of Carbon Taxes in Adjusting to Global Warming," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(407), pages 938-48, July.
  6. Antonia Cornwell, 1996. "Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Australia: A Minimum Disruption Approach," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 29(1), pages 65-81.
  7. Lambert, Peter J, 1993. " Evaluating Impact Effects of Tax Reforms," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 205-42, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
This item has more than 25 citations. To prevent cluttering this page, these citations are listed on a separate page.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:17:y:1996:i:3:p:21-38. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Stephanie Seavers).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.