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Why Do Good Cops Defend Bad Cops?

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  • Jean-Pierre Benoit
  • Juan Dubra

Abstract

Policemen are known to support colleagues who are the subject of criminal investigations. Although we might expect guilty officers to defend each other, why do (otherwise) law-abiding policemen defend those who have broken the law? We investigate under what conditions it is in the interest of a group to defend its "bad" members. Copyright 2004 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association in its journal International Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 45 (2004)
Issue (Month): 3 (08)
Pages: 787-809

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Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:45:y:2004:i:3:p:787-809

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Cited by:
  1. Gerd Muehlheusser & Andreas Roider, 2004. "Black Sheep and Walls of Silence," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse17_2005, University of Bonn, Germany, revised Jun 2005.
  2. Rafael Di Tella & Juan Dubra, 2006. "Crime and Punishment in the "American Dream"," NBER Working Papers 12641, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Mehmet Bac, 2009. "An economic rationale for firing whistleblowers," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 233-256, June.
  4. Dhammika Dharmapala & Thomas J. Miceli, 2003. "Search, Seizure and (False?) Arrest: An Analysis of Fourth Amendment Remedies when Police can Plant Evidence," Working papers 2003-37, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  5. David L. Dickinson & Daivd Masclet & Marie Claire Villeval, 2014. "Norm Enforcement in Social Dilemmas: An Experiment with Police Commissioners," Working Papers 14-02, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  6. Dickinson, David & Masclet, David & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2014. "Norm Enforcement in Social Dilemmas: An Experiment with Police Commissioners," IZA Discussion Papers 8218, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. David Dickinson & David Masclet & Marie Claire Villeval, 2014. "Norm Enforcement in Social Dilemmas. An Experiment with Police Commissioners," Working Papers halshs-00996511, HAL.
  8. Berentsen, Aleksander & Bruegger, Esther & Loertscher, Simon, 2008. "On cheating, doping and whistleblowing," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 415-436, June.
  9. Hugo Mialon & Sue Mialon, 2008. "The Economics of Search Warrants," Emory Economics 0810, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).

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