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Growth, Specialization, and Trade Liberalization

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  • Devereux, Michael B

Abstract

This paper examines a two-way interaction between trade liberalization and economic growth. Through increasing returns to specialization, international trade can increase world growth rates. But growth alters patterns of comparative advantage, changing the incentives to levy tariffs in a dynamic tariff game between governments. Two types of equilibria are analyzed. In a tariff war equilibrium, growth rates are low, tariffs are high and rising, and the ratio of exports to income, the trade ratio, is low and falls to zero asymptotically. In a trade liberalization equilibrium, growth rates are high, tariffs are low and falling, and the trade ratio is higher and is increasing over time. Copyright 1997 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association in its journal International Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 38 (1997)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 565-85

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Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:38:y:1997:i:3:p:565-85

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Cited by:
  1. Furusawa, Taiji & Lai, Edwin L. -C., 1999. "Adjustment costs and gradual trade liberalization," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 333-361, December.
  2. Maystre, Nicolas & Olivier, Jacques & Thoenig, Mathias & Verdier, Thierry, 2014. "Product-based cultural change: Is the village global?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 212-230.
  3. Jun Ishii & Kei-Mu Yi, 1997. "The growth of world trade," Research Paper 9718, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Ben Zissimos, 2006. "The GATT and Gradualism," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0619, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  5. Richard Chisik, 2010. "Gradualism in Free Trade Agreements: A Theoretical Justification," Working Papers, Ryerson University, Department of Economics 018, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
  6. Devereux, Michael B., 1999. "Growth and the dynamics of trade liberalization," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(5-6), pages 773-795, April.
  7. Kyle Bagwell & Robert W. Staiger, 2002. "GATT-think," Discussion Papers, Columbia University, Department of Economics 0102-39, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  8. Carsten Kowalczyk & Raymond Riezman, 2009. "Trade Agreements," CESifo Working Paper Series 2660, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Kyle Bagwell, 2009. "Self-Enforcing Trade Agreements and Private Information," NBER Working Papers 14812, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Oetzel, Jennifer M. & Banerjee, Sudeshna Ghosh, 2008. "A case of the tortoise versus the hare? Deregulation process, timing, and firm performance in emerging markets," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 54-77, February.
  11. Maoz, Yishay David & Peled, Dan & Sarid, Assaf, . "Trade Agreements, Bargaining and Economic Growth," Working Papers WP2010/2, University of Haifa, Department of Economics, revised 30 May 2010.
  12. Sauré, Philip, 2014. "Domestic policies in self-enforcing trade agreements," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 19-30.
  13. repec:att:wimass:9405 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Robert W. Staiger, 1994. "A Theory of Gradual Trade Liberalization," NBER Working Papers 4620, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Opp, Marcus M., 2010. "Tariff wars in the Ricardian Model with a continuum of goods," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 212-225, March.

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