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Misunderstanding Classical Economics: The Sraffian Interpretation of the Surplus Approach

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  • Mark Blaug

Abstract

In the last decade or so, disciples of Piero Sraffa have propagated a particular interpretation of classical economics, according to which the classical economists focussed on the 'core' of their analysis on the determination of relative prices in long-run equilibrium, taking as given the volume of output, its commodity composition, the technology of every industry, and real wages; everything else in classical economics is said to belong to the periphery and follows from the analysis at the core.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Duke University Press in its journal History of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 31 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 (Summer)
Pages: 213-236

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Handle: RePEc:hop:hopeec:v:31:y:1999:i:2:p:213-236

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Keywords: Piero Sraffa; surplus approach;

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Cited by:
  1. Neri Salvadori & Rodolfo Signorino, 2013. "The Classical Notion of Competition Revisited," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 45(1), pages 149-175, Spring.
  2. Glenn Hueckel, . "Walker's "Equilibrium": A Review Essay," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2002-16, Claremont Colleges.
  3. Howard Petith, 2001. "A Descriptive and Analytic Look at Marxs Own Explanations for the Falling Rate of Profit (Long Version," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 485.01, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  4. Heinz D. Kurz & Neri Salvadori, 2011. "In Favor of Rigor and Relevance: A Reply to Mark Blaug," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 43(3), pages 607-616, Fall.
  5. Howard Petith, 2001. "A Descriptive and Analytic Look at Marxs Own Explanations for the Falling Rate of Profit," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 486.01, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  6. Mark Blaug, 2001. "No History of Ideas, Please, We're Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 145-164, Winter.
  7. Fabio Petri, 2006. "General Equilibrium Theory and Professor Blaug," Department of Economics University of Siena 486, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  8. Yann Giraud & Pedro Garcia Duarte, 2014. "Chasing the B: A Bibliographic Account of Economics’ Relation to its Past, 1991-2011," THEMA Working Papers 2014-09, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.

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