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Policy Instruments towards a Sustainable Waste Management

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Author Info

  • Göran Finnveden

    ()
    (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Tomas Ekvall

    (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, PO Box 530 21, SE-400 14 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Yevgeniya Arushanyan

    (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Mattias Bisaillon

    (Profu AB, Årstaängsvägen 1A, SE-117 43 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Greger Henriksson

    (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Ulrika Gunnarsson Östling

    (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Maria Ljunggren Söderman

    (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, PO Box 530 21, SE-400 14 Stockholm, Sweden
    Chalmers University of Technology, Environmental Systems Analysis, Energy and Environment, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden)

  • Jenny Sahlin

    (Profu AB, Götaforsliden 13, SE-43134 Mölndal, Sweden)

  • Åsa Stenmarck

    (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 210 60, SE-100 31 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Johan Sundberg

    (Profu AB, Götaforsliden 13, SE-43134 Mölndal, Sweden)

  • Jan-Olov Sundqvist

    (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 210 60, SE-100 31 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Åsa Svenfelt

    (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Patrik Söderholm

    (Luleå University of Technology, Economics Unit, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden)

  • Anna Björklund

    (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Ola Eriksson

    (Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, University of Gävle, SE-800 76, Gävle, Sweden)

  • Tomas Forsfält

    (Konjunkturinstitutet, P.O. Box 3116, SE-103 62 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Mona Guath

    (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to suggest and discuss policy instruments that could lead towards a more sustainable waste management. The paper is based on evaluations from a large scale multi-disciplinary Swedish research program. The evaluations focus on environmental and economic impacts as well as social acceptance. The focus is on the Swedish waste management system but the results should be relevant also for other countries. Through the assessments and lessons learned during the research program we conclude that several policy instruments can be effective and possible to implement. Particularly, we put forward the following policy instruments: “Information”; “Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials”; “Weight-based waste fee in combination with information and developed recycling systems”; “Mandatory labeling of products containing hazardous chemicals”, “Advertisements on request only and other waste minimization measures”; and “Differentiated VAT and subsidies for some services”. Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials is the policy instrument that has the largest potential for decreasing the environmental impacts with the configurations studied here. The effects of the other policy instruments studied may be more limited and they typically need to be implemented in combination in order to have more significant impacts. Furthermore, policy makers need to take into account market and international aspects when implementing new instruments. In the more long term perspective, the above set of policy instruments may also need to be complemented with more transformational policy instruments that can significantly decrease the generation of waste.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

Volume (Year): 5 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (February)
Pages: 841-881

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Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:5:y:2013:i:3:p:841-881:d:23851

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Related research

Keywords: policy instruments; landfilling; incineration; recycling; waste minimization;

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References

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  1. Norimichi Matsueda & Yoko Nagase, 2011. "An Economic Analysis of the Packaging Waste Recovery Note System in the UK," Discussion Paper Series 72, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jun 2011.
  2. Palmer, Karen & Sigman, Hilary & Walls, Margaret, 1997. "The Cost of Reducing Municipal Solid Waste," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 128-150, June.
  3. Richard O'Doherty & Ian Bailey & Alan Collins, 2003. "Regulatory failure via market evolution: the case of UK packaging recycling," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 21(4), pages 579-595, August.
  4. Francesco Nicolli & Nick Johnstone & Patrik Söderholm, 2012. "Resolving failures in recycling markets: the role of technological innovation," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 14(3), pages 261-288, July.
  5. Heleen Bartelings & Thomas Sterner, 1999. "Household Waste Management in a Swedish Municipality: Determinants of Waste Disposal, Recycling and Composting," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(4), pages 473-491, June.
  6. Kjell Arne Brekke & Gorm Kipperberg & Karine Nyborg, 2010. "Social Interaction in Responsibility Ascription: The Case of Household Recycling," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 86(4), pages 766-784.
  7. Weitzman, Martin L, 1974. "Prices vs. Quantities," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 477-91, October.
  8. Don Fullerton & Wenbo Wu, 1996. "Policies for Green Design," NBER Working Papers 5594, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Palmer, Karen & Walls, Margaret, 2000. "Upstream Pollution, Downstream Waste Disposal, and the Design of Comprehensive Environmental Policies," Discussion Papers dp-97-51-rev, Resources For the Future.
  10. Fullerton Don & Kinnaman Thomas C., 1995. "Garbage, Recycling, and Illicit Burning or Dumping," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 78-91, July.
  11. Walls, Margaret & Calcott, Paul, 2002. "Waste, Recycling, and "Design for Environment": Roles for Markets and Policy Instruments," Discussion Papers dp-00-30-rev, Resources For the Future.
  12. Thomas C. Kinnaman, 2006. "Policy Watch: Examining the Justification for Residential Recycling," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 219-232, Fall.
  13. Annegrete Bruvoll & Karine Nyborg, 2004. "The Cold Shiver of Not Giving Enough: On the Social Cost of Recycling Campaigns," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 80(4).
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