Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Prospects and Challenges for Disseminating Life Cycle Thinking towards Environmental Conscious Behaviors in Daily Lives

Contents:

Author Info

  • Kazutoshi Tsuda

    ()
    (School/Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan)

  • Keishiro Hara

    ()
    (Center for Environmental Innovation Design for Sustainability (CEIDS), Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan)

  • Michinori Uwasu

    ()
    (Center for Environmental Innovation Design for Sustainability (CEIDS), Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    We examined the existing practices of various media to ascertain the usability of information based on life cycle thinking (LCT) which can be key to changing consciousness and behavior of consumers towards pursuing a sustainable society . Such information has been provided to consumers in various forms in various places at various times. Nevertheless, a number of issues, such as understandability , selectability, reliability, transparency, and costs etc ., must still be addressed before consumers will be able to use such information as guidelines for pro-environmental behaviors in their everyday life. Further, it is also of critical importance that the consumers can culture LCT by encouraging themselves to be actively engaged in the design and evaluation processes of the upstream of productions and in the entire product life cycle. Another crucial challenge is finding ways to connect LCT with, not just product selection or designing and manufacturing, but lifestyle transformation. We need to encourage ourselves and others to think about what a sustainable life really means.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/5/1/123/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/5/1/123/
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

    Volume (Year): 5 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 123-135

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:5:y:2013:i:1:p:123-135:d:22640

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.mdpi.com/

    Related research

    Keywords: life cycle thinking ; environmental conscious behavior; consumer; visualization; personal fabrication;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Isamu Matsukawa, 2004. "The Effects of Information on Residential Demand for Electricity," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-18.
    2. Webster, Frederick E, Jr, 1975. " Determining the Characteristics of the Socially Conscious Consumer," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(3), pages 188-96, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:5:y:2013:i:1:p:123-135:d:22640. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.