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Profitability of Small-Scale Fisheries in Elmina, Ghana

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Author Info

  • Denis W. Aheto

    ()
    (Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of Cape Coast, PMB, Cape Coast, Ghana)

  • Noble K. Asare

    ()
    (Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of Cape Coast, PMB, Cape Coast, Ghana)

  • Belinda Quaynor

    ()
    (Marine Fisheries and Research Division (MFRD), P.O. Box BT 62, Tema, Ghana)

  • Emmanuel Y. Tenkorang

    ()
    (Institute for Development Studies (IDS), University of Cape Coast, PMB, Cape Coast, Ghana)

  • Cephas Asare

    ()
    (WorldFish Center, Jalan Batu Maung, Batu Maung, 11960 Bayan Lepas, Penang, Malaysia)

  • Isaac Okyere

    ()
    (Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of Cape Coast, PMB, Cape Coast, Ghana)

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    Abstract

    In order to achieve sustainable fishing livelihoods in coastal communities, data on profitability of small-scale fisheries relative to fish species caught and gear types used by fishermen is required as part of a broader fisheries management strategy. This study was undertaken with this in mind. Interviews were conducted among 60 fishermen between February and March 2010. Economic assessment of small-scale fishing activities were done using questionnaires based on direct market pricing and contingent valuation methods. The results indicate that highly profitable fish species include Epinephelus aeneus , Sparus caeruleostictus , Dentex angolensis and Lutjanus goreensis valued at US$2.97, US$2.87, US$2.85 and US$2.63 per kilogram respectively. The less profitable species include Dasyatis margarita , Caranx crysos and Sardinella aurita valued at US$0.34, US$0.66 and US$ 0.85 per kilogram respectively. Although Sardinella aurita was among the less valuable fish species, it was the main species driving profits for the fishermen due to its high share volume among the fish catches. Findings from this study suggest high rates of exploitation, in that stocks generally cannot provide for increased economic return in the face of increased investment. This is a clear indicator that the open-access nature of Ghanaian fisheries is not sustainable, and management reform is well overdue.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 11 (October)
    Pages: 2785-2794

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    Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:11:p:2785-2794:d:20934

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    Related research

    Keywords: small-scale fisheries; economic assessment; fishing livelihoods; Elmina;

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    1. H. Scott Gordon, 1954. "The Economic Theory of a Common-Property Resource: The Fishery," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62, pages 124.
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