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An error-correction model of U.S. M2 demand

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  • Yash P. Mehra
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    Abstract

    An error-correction model is used to study the long- and short-run determinants of U.S. demand for M2. The money demand function presented here exhibits parameter stability and predicts quite well the actual behavior of M2 growth in the 1980s.

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    File URL: http://www.richmondfed.org/publications/research/economic_review/1991/pdf/er770301.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond in its journal Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): (1991)
    Issue (Month): May ()
    Pages: 3-12

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrer:y:1991:i:may:p:3-12:n:v.77no.3

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    Related research

    Keywords: Money supply;

    References

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    1. Godfrey, Leslie G, 1978. "Testing for Higher Order Serial Correlation in Regression Equations When the Regressors Include Lagged Dependent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1303-10, November.
    2. Phillips, P.C.B., 1986. "Understanding spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 311-340, December.
    3. Schwert, G. William, 1987. "Effects of model specification on tests for unit roots in macroeconomic data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 73-103, July.
    4. Mankiw, N Gregory & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "Money Demand and the Effects of Fiscal Policies," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 18(4), pages 415-29, November.
    5. Goodfriend, Marvin, 1990. "Comments on "Money demand, expectations and the forward-looking model"," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 317-322.
    6. Baum, Christopher F & Furno, Marilena, 1990. "Analyzing the Stability of Demand-for-Money Equations via Bounded-Influence Estimation Techniques," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 22(4), pages 465-77, November.
    7. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
    8. Hendry, David F. & Richard, Jean-Francois, 1982. "On the formulation of empirical models in dynamic econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 3-33, October.
    9. Jeffrey J. Hallman & Richard D. Porter & David H. Small, 1989. "M2 per unit of potential GNP as an anchor for the price level," Staff Studies 157, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Engle, Robert F. & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1987. "Forecasting and testing in co-integrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 143-159, May.
    11. Hendry, David F. & Pagan, Adrian R. & Sargan, J.Denis, 1984. "Dynamic specification," Handbook of Econometrics, in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 18, pages 1023-1100 Elsevier.
    12. Hetzel, Robert L & Mehra, Yash P, 1989. "The Behavior of Money Demand in the 1980s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(4), pages 455-63, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Mcgibany, James M. & Nourzad, Farrokh, 1995. "Exchange rate volatility and the demand for money in the U.S," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 411-425.
    2. Bhatta, Siddha Raj, 2011. "Stability of demand for money function in Nepal: A cointegration and error correction modeling approach," MPRA Paper 41404, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. J.P.A. Sagaram & J. Wickramanayake, 2005. "Financial centers in the Asia-pacific region: an empirical study on australia, Hong Kong, Japan and Singapore," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 58(232), pages 21-51.
    4. van den Berg, Hendrik, 1997. "The relationship between international trade and economic growth in Mexico," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 1-21.
    5. Darrat, Ali F. & Al-Mutawa, Ahmed, 1996. "Modelling money demand in the United Arab Emirates," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 65-87.
    6. J.P.A. Sagaram & J. Wickramanayake, 2005. "Financial centers in the Asia-pacific region: an empirical study on australia, Hong Kong, Japan and Singapore," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 58(232), pages 21-51.

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