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The macroeconomics of oil shocks

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  • Keith Sill

Abstract

For various reasons, oil-price increases may lead to significant slowdowns in economic growth. Five of the last seven U.S. recessions were preceded by significant increases in the price of oil. In “The Macroeconomics of Oil Shocks,” Keith Sill examines the effect of changes in oil prices on U.S. economic activity, focusing on how runups in the price of oil can affect output growth and inflation. He also discusses the channels by which oil-price increases might affect the economy and the historical evidence on the relationship between oil prices, economic growth, and inflation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia in its journal Business Review.

Volume (Year): (2007)
Issue (Month): Q1 ()
Pages: 21-31

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpbr:y:2007:i:q1:p:21-31

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Keywords: Petroleum products - Prices;

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Cited by:
  1. Al-mulali, Usama & Che Sab, Normee, 2009. "The Impact of Oil Prices on the Real Exchange Rate of the Dirham: a Case Study of the United Arab Emirates," MPRA Paper 23493, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Ediger, Volkan S. & Berk, Istemi, 2011. "Crude oil import policy of Turkey: Historical analysis of determinants and implications since 1968," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 2132-2142, April.
  3. Lizardo, Radhamés A. & Mollick, André V., 2010. "Oil price fluctuations and U.S. dollar exchange rates," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 399-408, March.
  4. Roc Armenter, 2011. "Output gaps: uses and limitation," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q1, pages 1-8.
  5. Berk, Istemi & Aydogan, Berna, 2012. "Crude Oil Price Shocks and Stock Returns: Evidence from Turkish Stock Market under Global Liquidity Conditions," EWI Working Papers 2012-15, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln.
  6. Bettina Lis & Christian Neßler & Jan Retzmann, 2012. "Oil and Cars: The Impact of Crude Oil Prices on the Stock Returns of Automotive Companies," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 2(2), pages 190-200.
  7. Hammoudeh, Shawkat & Bhar, Ramaprasad & Thompson, Mark A., 2010. "Re-examining the dynamic causal oil-macroeconomy relationship," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 298-305, September.
  8. Iwayemi, Akin & Fowowe, Babajide, 2011. "Impact of oil price shocks on selected macroeconomic variables in Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 603-612, February.
  9. Oya Celasun & Lev Ratnovski & Roxana Mihet, 2012. "Commodity Prices and Inflation Expectations in the United States," IMF Working Papers 12/89, International Monetary Fund.

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