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Slow work force growth: a challenge for the Midwest?

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  • Richard E. Kaglic
  • William A. Testa
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    Abstract

    If today's tight labor market in the Midwest can be sustained, as now seems likely, the region's policymakers and businesses will face problems associated with labor-constrained growth rather than the underemployment of the recent past. An era of tight labor markets can be expected to add impetus to public policies that improve labor market efficiency, along with those that address perceived labor market imperfections.

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    File URL: http://www.chicagofed.org/digital_assets/publications/economic_perspectives/1999/ep2Q99_3.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in its journal Economic Perspectives.

    Volume (Year): (1999)
    Issue (Month): Q II ()
    Pages: 31-46

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:1999:i:qii:p:31-46:n:v.23no.2

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    Related research

    Keywords: Labor market ; Labor supply ; Middle West ; Employment (Economic theory);

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