Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

State business tax climate: how should it be measured and how important is it?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Robert Tannenwald

Abstract

States are more concerned than ever before about their business tax climate. Over the past two decades, profound technological and political changes have enhanced employers' geographic mobility and extended their geographic range, thereby intensifying economic competition both within the United States and throughout the world. This study ranks the business tax climate of 22 states, including the six within New England. It finds only modest differences in business tax climate among most states. Within the region, New Hampshire and Massachusetts have the most attractive business tax climates.> The study also estimates the importance of business tax climate in determining where manufacturers invest in plant and equipment. Business tax climate exerts only a small, highly uncertain effect on such investment. States may be more likely to stimulate their economy by enhancing public services valued by business.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/neer/neer1996/neer196b.htm
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/neer/neer1996/neer196b.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Boston in its journal New England Economic Review.

Volume (Year): (1996)
Issue (Month): Jan ()
Pages: 23-38

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:1996:i:jan:p:23-38

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 600 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02210
Phone: 617-973-3397
Fax: 617-973-4221
Email:
Web page: http://www.bos.frb.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: State finance ; Taxation;

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Fuerst, Franz & Mollenkopf, John, 2005. "Are Local Economic Development Incentives Promoting Job Growth? An Empirical Case Study," MPRA Paper 11444, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Peter S. Fisher, 1997. "Tax and spending incentives and enterprise zones," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 109-138.
  3. Robert Tannenwald, 2004. "Massachusetts business taxes: unfair? inadequate? uncompetitive?," Public Policy Discussion Paper 04-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  4. W. Robert Reed & Cynthia L. Rogers, 2005. "Tax Cuts and Employment Growth in New Jersey: Lessons From a Regional Analysis," Urban/Regional 0506010, EconWPA.
  5. Feld, Lars P. & Kirchgassner, Gebhard, 2003. "The impact of corporate and personal income taxes on the location of firms and on employment: some panel evidence for the Swiss cantons," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 129-155, January.
  6. Charles Ian Mead, 2001. "State user costs of capital," Working Papers 01-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  7. Michael Wasylenko, 1997. "Taxation and economic development: the state of the economic literature," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 37-52.
  8. Ronald C. Fisher, 1997. "Effects of state and local public services on economic development," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 53-82.
  9. Bondonio, Daniele & Engberg, John, 2000. "Enterprise zones and local employment: evidence from the states' programs," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 519-549, September.
  10. Timothy J. Bartik, . "Discussion [of the Effects of State and Local Public Services on Economic Development by Ronald C. Fisher]," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles tjb1997, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  11. Robert Tannenwald & Nicholas Turner, 2004. "Interstate fiscal disparity in state fiscal year 1999," Public Policy Discussion Paper 04-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  12. Cletus C. Coughlin & Jerram C. Betts, 1996. "The location of new foreign-owned manufacturing plants in the United States and Seventh Federal Reserve District," Assessing the Midwest Economy GL-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:1996:i:jan:p:23-38. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Catherine Spozio).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.