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Suicide in Ireland: The Influence of Alcohol and Unemployment

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Author Info

  • Brendan Walsh

    (University College Dublin)

  • Dermot Walsh

    (Mental Health Commission)

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    Abstract

    We model the behaviour of the Irish suicide rate over the period 1968-2009 using the unemployment rate and the level of alcohol consumption as the principal explanatory variables. We find that alcohol consumption is a significant influence on the suicide rate among younger males. Its influence on the female suicide rate is not well-established, although there is some evidence that it plays a role in the 15-24 age group. The unemployment rate is also a significant influence on the male suicide rate in the younger age groups but evidence of its influence on the female suicide rate is lacking. The behaviour of suicide rates among males aged 55 and over and females aged 25 and over is unaccounted for by our model. The findings suggest that higher alcohol consumption played a significant role in the very rapid increase in suicide mortality among young Irish males between the late 1980s and the end of the century. In the early twenty first century a combination of falling alcohol consumption and low unemployment led to a marked reduction in suicide rates. The recent rise in suicide rates may be attributed to the sharp rise in unemployment, especially among males, but it has been moderated by the continuing fall in alcohol consumption. Finally, we discuss some policy implications of our findings.

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    File URL: http://www.esr.ie/vol42_1/02%20Walsh%20article.pdf
    File Function: First version,2011
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Economic and Social Studies in its journal Economic and Social Review.

    Volume (Year): 42 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 27-47

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    Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:42:y:2011:i:1:p:27-47

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    Web page: http://www.esr.ie

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    1. Finbarr Brereton & J. Peter Clinch & Susana Ferreira, 2008. "Employment and Life-Satisfaction: Insights from Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 39(3), pages 207-234.
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Suicide and the Recession - again
      by Brendan Walsh in The Irish Economy on 2013-09-18 23:22:39
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    Cited by:
    1. Hudson, Eibhlin, 2013. "Does relative material wealth matter for child and adolescent life satisfaction?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 38-47.

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