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Environmentally Sustainable National Income: Indispensable Information for Attaining Environmental Sustainability

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  • Roefie Hueting

Abstract

Environmental functions are defined as the possible uses of the non-human-made physical surroundings on which humanity is entirely dependent. Competing functions are by definition economic goods, indeed the most fundamental humanity disposes of. Environmental sustainability is defined as the dynamic equilibrium by which vital environmental functions remain available for future generations. Environmentally sustainable national income (eSNI) is defined as the maximum attainable production level by which vital environmental functions remain available for future generations. Thus the eSNI provides information about the distance between the current and a sustainable situation. In combination with the standard national income (NI), the eSNI indicates whether the part of the production that is not based on sustainable use of the environment is increasing or decreasing in the course of time. Calculation of the eSNI involves the use of environmental models and a static general economic equilibrium model. It is shown that asymmetric entries are obscuring what is happening with both environment and production and that there is no conflict between employment and safeguarding the environment.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by White Horse Press in its journal Environmental Values.

Volume (Year): 22 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 81-100

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Handle: RePEc:env:journl:ev22:ev2206

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Web page: http://www.erica.demon.co.uk

Related research

Keywords: Environmental function; economic growth; sustainability; employment; asymmetric entries;

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References

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  1. Hueting, Roefie, 1990. "The Brundtland report : A matter of conflicting goals," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 109-117, June.
  2. Hueting, Roefie, 1996. "Three persistent myths in the environmental debate," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 81-88, August.
  3. Hueting, Roefie, 1991. "The use of the discount rate in a cost-benefit analysis for different uses of a humid tropical forest area," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 43-57, March.
  4. World Commission on Environment and Development,, 1987. "Our Common Future," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780192820808.
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Cited by:
  1. Clive L. Spash, 2013. "Changes Needed," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 22(1), pages 1-5, February.

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