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Race and gender discrimination in the labor market: an urban and rural sector analysis for Brazil

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Author Info

  • Paulo R.A. Loureiro
  • Francisco Galrão Carneiro
  • Adolfo Sachsida

Abstract

The article investigates the existence of discrimination in the urban and rural labor markets in Brazil. Tests the hypothesis that returns to education are different for black and white workers, male and female, in the urban and rural sectors. The methodology used allows for the decomposition of the difference in the mean earnings of male and female workers in the urban and rural sectors in a share that can be explained by characteristics such as education, hours of work and experience, and in another share that reflects the existence of discrimination. The analysis is carried out with microdata from the National Household Surveys (PNADs) of 1992 and 1998. The choice of the period of analysis was made with the aim of investigating whether changes in the economic environment affect the standard of returns to education. The results suggest the existence of strong discrimination by gender and race, besides the presence of substantial wage differentials between urban and rural workers.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Emerald Group Publishing in its journal Journal of Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 31 (2004)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 129-143

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Handle: RePEc:eme:jespps:v:31:y:2004:i:2:p:129-143

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Related research

Keywords: Brazil; Discrimination; Education; Pay differentials; Rural areas; Urban areas;

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Cited by:
  1. Wenjun Liu & Tomokazu Nomura & Shoji Nishijima, 2011. "Gender Discrimination and Firm Profit Efficiency:Evidence from Brazil," Discussion Papers 1019, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  2. Jacqueline Agesa & Richard U. Agesa & Carlos Lopes, 2011. "Can imports mitigate racial earnings inequality?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(2), pages 156-170, May.
  3. Boris Hirsch & Marion König & Joachim Möller, 2013. "Is There a Gap in the Gap? Regional Differences in the Gender Pay Gap," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 60(4), pages 412-439, 09.
  4. Ioannis Theodossiou & Grigoris Zarotiadis, 2010. "Employment and unemployment duration in less developed regions," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(5), pages 505-524, September.
  5. Salma Ahmed & Pushkar Maitra, 2008. "Public Pension Governance And Asset Allocation," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 23/08, Monash University, Department of Economics.

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