Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Fighting corruption: an expectation augmented approach

Contents:

Author Info

  • Mobolaji ‘Hakeem Ishola
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of expectation in fighting corruption in a society. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology is analytical in nature, drawing evidence from the Quran, Hadith and Seerah. It has a strong theoretical basis on the role of expectation in eliciting desirable response. Findings – The paper suggests that a continuous disregard to corruption-reducing impact of the revealed ethics would always lead to a suboptimal anti-corruption policy and exacerbate a drifting pressure to locally stable corruption equilibrium. Research limitations/implications – The paper focuses on the role of expectation at micro level, a macroeconomic perspective can be a good research effort. Also, due to the paucity of data as a result of the nature of the topic being investigated, new research can further investigate this issue empirically. Practical implications – Potential outcome of this paper is to stem the wave of corruption through revealed ethics or God consciousness which is relatively easier to administer and less costly, since reform effort is internally supported not externally imposed. Social implications – This paper would positively impact on the society, by stemming the upsurge of corruption through religious ethics. It further allocates a greater role to the society in curbing corruption through the revealed ethics. This paper would positively influence public attitudes towards corruption, hence improve the quality of. Originality/value – The paper is novel, in that it applies an economic theory to solving a social menace. It further optimally combines both conventional economic theory with revealed religious teachings and argues that both may not conflict if properly understood or properly applied. The paper is a necessary bridge between Western perspective and Islamic Position, more importantly now that the world is looking for a viable alternative to the inadequacies of the conventional Western perspectives. JEL classification: D01, D73, D84, Z12

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0828-8666&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17031580&show=abstract
    Download Restriction: Cannot be freely downloaded

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Emerald Group Publishing in its journal Humanomics: The International Journal of Systems and Ethics.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 133-147

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eme:humpps:v:28:y:2012:i:2:p:133-147

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.emeraldinsight.com

    Order Information:
    Postal: Emerald Group Publishing, Howard House, Wagon Lane, Bingley, BD16 1WA, UK
    Email:
    Web: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/h.htm

    Related research

    Keywords: Corruption; Corruption expectation; Ethics; Microeconomic behaviour;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Svensson, Jakob, 2000. "Who must pay bribes and how much? Evidence from a cross-section of firms," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2486, The World Bank.
    2. de Melo, Martha & Ofer, Gur & Sandler, Olga, 1995. "Pioneers for Profit: St. Petersburg Entrepreneurs in Services," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(3), pages 425-50, September.
    3. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    4. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1995. "Institutions And Economic Performance: Cross-Country Tests Using Alternative Institutional Measures," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 207-227, November.
    5. Shang-Jin Wei, 1997. "How Taxing is Corruption on International Investors?," NBER Working Papers 6030, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Fisman, Raymond & Svensson, Jakob, 2000. "Are corruption and taxation really harmful to growth? - firm-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2485, The World Bank.
    7. Milton Friedman, 1957. "Introduction to "A Theory of the Consumption Function"," NBER Chapters, in: A Theory of the Consumption Function, pages 1-6 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. O'Donoghue, Ted & Rabin, Matthew, 2000. "Choice and Procrastination," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt5r26k54p, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    9. International Monetary Fund, 1997. "Corruption and the Rate of Temptation," IMF Working Papers 97/73, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Easterly, W & Levine, R, 1996. "Africa's Growth Tragedy : Policies and Ethnic Divisions," Papers 536, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
    11. Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard, 2003. "Social Capital, Corruption and Economic Growth: Eastern and Western Europe," Working Papers 03-21, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    12. Francis Fukuyama, 2000. "Social Capital and Civil Society," IMF Working Papers 00/74, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Lui, Francis T, 1985. "An Equilibrium Queuing Model of Bribery," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(4), pages 760-81, August.
    14. Pranab Bardhan, 1997. "Corruption and Development: A Review of Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1320-1346, September.
    15. Coolidge, Jacqueline & Rose-Ackerman, Susan, 1997. "High-level rent-seeking and corruption in African regimes : theory and cases," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1780, The World Bank.
    16. Milton Friedman, 1957. "A Theory of the Consumption Function," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie57-1, May.
    17. Murphy, Kevin M & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1993. "Why Is Rent-Seeking So Costly to Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 409-14, May.
    18. Mauro, Paolo, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eme:humpps:v:28:y:2012:i:2:p:133-147. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Virginia Chapman).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.