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Assessing the Determinants of Male Earnings Dispersion

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  • K Taylor

Abstract

This paper considers male earnings dispersion in the United Kingdom in four industries from 1973 to 1995. The analysis takes place in two stages. Firstly, earnings dispersion over time is split into two components: between-group earnings dispersion due to differing worker characteristics across the population; and within-group earnings dispersion, that is any remaining earnings dispersion after controlling for measurable worker characteristics. Secondly, that part of earnings dispersion which cannot be explained by observable worker characteristics is examined by industry using time series techniques to assess the impact of technological change; globalisation; female participation; immigration; and institutional changes upon remaining dispersion.

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File URL: http://www.economicissues.org.uk/Files/2002/202cTaylor.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Economic Issues in its journal Economic Issues.

Volume (Year): 7 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 (September)
Pages: 35-58

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Handle: RePEc:eis:articl:202taylor

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  1. Pesaran, M.H. & Shin, Y., 1995. "An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Modelling Approach to Cointegration Analysis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9514, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  2. Otero, Jesus & Smith, Jeremy, 2000. "Testing for cointegration: power versus frequency of observation -- further Monte Carlo results," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 5-9, April.
  3. Karl Taylor, 2002. "The impact of technology and trade upon the returns to education and occupation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(11), pages 1371-1377.
  4. Julia Campos & Neil R. Ericsson & David F. Hendry, 1993. "Cointegration tests in the presence of structural breaks," International Finance Discussion Papers 440, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Bell, Brian D, 1997. "The Performance of Immigrants in the United Kingdom: Evidence from the GHS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(441), pages 333-44, March.
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