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Stock Market Efficiency, Non-Linearity, Thin Trading and Asymmetric Information in MENA Stock Markets

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  • Barry Harrison
  • Winston Moore

Abstract

The concept of market efficiency has been investigated thoroughly in recent years, with most studies focussing on developed economies. Far fewer investigations have been carried out into emerging markets, and results have been mixed. Some emerging markets appear to be weak form efficient whereas others seem to be inefficient. Emerging markets are typically characterised by thin trading and low levels of liquidity as well as, in some cases, ill-informed investors with access to information that is sometimes less than reliable. This might partly explain why some emerging markets are information inefficient. In this paper we investigate stock market efficiency in a group of emerging markets in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. In particular we test the results of Abdmoulah (2010) who finds that the MENA region markets investigated are inefficient and, despite growth in size and the implementation of reforms designed to improve the operation of markets in the region, they exhibit little evidence of evolving market efficiency. This raises the possibility that further reform is necessary. We test for evolving market efficiency using a methodology that extends the approach adopted by Abdmoulah (2010). However, our results are broadly similar.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Economic Issues in its journal Economic Issues.

Volume (Year): 17 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 77-93

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Handle: RePEc:eis:articl:112harrison

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  1. Barry Harrison & David Paton, 2005. "Transition, the Evolution of Stock Market Efficiency and Entry into EU: The Case of Romania," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 203-223, 09.
  2. Cohen, Kalman J, et al, 1980. " Implications of Microstructure Theory for Empirical Research on Stock Price Behavior," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 35(2), pages 249-57, May.
  3. Fama, Eugene F., 1998. "Market efficiency, long-term returns, and behavioral finance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 283-306, September.
  4. Miller, Merton H & Muthuswamy, Jayaram & Whaley, Robert E, 1994. " Mean Reversion of Standard & Poor's 500 Index Basis Changes: Arbitrage-Induced or Statistical Illusion?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(2), pages 479-513, June.
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  8. Benartzi, Shlomo & Thaler, Richard H, 1995. "Myopic Loss Aversion and the Equity Premium Puzzle," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(1), pages 73-92, February.
  9. Hinich, Melvin J & Patterson, Douglas M, 1985. "Evidence of Nonlinearity in Daily Stock Returns," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 3(1), pages 69-77, January.
  10. Barry Harrison & Winston Moore, 2010. "Nonlinearities in Stock Returns for Some Recent Entrants to the EU," Working Papers 2010/1, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
  11. Hawawini, Gabriel & Cohen, Kalman & Maier, Steven & Schwartz, Robert & Whitcomb, David, 1980. "Implications of microstructure theory for empirical research in stock price behavior," MPRA Paper 33976, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Mohamed A. El-Erian & Manmohan S. Kumar, 1995. "Emerging Equity Markets in Middle Eastern Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(2), pages 313-343, June.
  13. Bradley, Michael D. & Jansen, Dennis W., 2004. "Forecasting with a nonlinear dynamic model of stock returns and industrial production," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 321-342.
  14. Jennifer Castle & David Hendry, 2010. "A Low-Dimension Portmanteau Test for Non-linearity," Economics Series Working Papers 471, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  15. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
  16. Kim, Sei-Wan & Mollick, André V. & Nam, Kiseok, 2008. "Common nonlinearities in long-horizon stock returns: Evidence from the G-7 stock markets," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 19-31.
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