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Pro-equity Effects of Ancillary Benefits of Climate Change Policies: A Case Study of Human Health Impacts of Outdoor Air Pollution in New Delhi

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  • Garg, Amit
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    Abstract

    Summary This paper looks at the human health impacts from urban air pollution in India. Such pollution is especially harmful to poor people, so the co-benefits from global climate change policies in terms of reduced local air pollution can have positive equity impacts. Health impacts (mortality and morbidity) of PM10 pollution are quantified for different socio-economic groups in Delhi. The spatial PM10 concentration levels are overlaid with spatial socio-economic data. Improvement in air quality would result in bigger health benefits for the poor. Most measures that reduce PM10 pollutants also reduce CO2 emissions while simultaneously imposing more costs on the better-off.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 6 (June)
    Pages: 1002-1025

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:6:p:1002-1025

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

    Related research

    Keywords: human health impacts particulate emissions CO2 mitigation ancillary benefits; income equity;

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    1. Krupnick, Alan J. & Harrington, Winston & Ostro, Bart, 1990. "Ambient ozone and acute health effects: Evidence from daily data," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-18, January.
    2. Amit Garg & P.R. Shukla & Debyani Ghosh & Manmohan Kapshe & Nair Rajesh, 2003. "Future Greenhouse Gas and Local Pollutant Emissions for India: Policy Links and Disjoints," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 71-92, March.
    3. Muennig, Peter & Franks, Peter & Jia, Haomiao & Lubetkin, Erica & Gold, Marthe R, 2005. "The income-associated burden of disease in the United States," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(9), pages 2018-2026, November.
    4. Ostro, Bart D., 1987. "Air pollution and morbidity revisited: A specification test," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 87-98, March.
    5. Shah, J.J. & Nagpal, T., 1997. "Urban Air Quality Management Strategy in Asia. Greater Mumbai Report," Papers 381, World Bank - Technical Papers.
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    Cited by:
    1. Barrett, Sam, 2014. "Subnational Climate Justice? Adaptation Finance Distribution and Climate Vulnerability," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 130-142.
    2. Garg, Amit & Vishwanathan, Saritha & Avashia, Vidhee, 2013. "Life cycle greenhouse gas emission assessment of major petroleum oil products for transport and household sectors in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 38-48.
    3. Thomas Bassetti & Nikos Benos & Stelios Karagiannis, 2013. "CO 2 Emissions and Income Dynamics: What Does the Global Evidence Tell Us?," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(1), pages 101-125, January.

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