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The Effect of ILO Minimum Age Conventions on Child Labor and School Attendance: Evidence From Aggregate and Individual-Level Data

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Author Info

  • Boockmann, Bernhard

Abstract

Summary Child labor has always been a core concern of the International Labor Organization (ILO). This paper investigates whether ILO conventions have contributed to reducing the scale of the problem. Two approaches to answering the question are used. First, evidence based on country-level data show that, by 1990, child labor was not less and school attendance was not greater in countries having ratified ILO conventions compared with non-ratifying states. Second, in individual-level data on school attendance from the 1990s, little evidence can be found for an increase in school attendance for children protected by ILO Convention 138 compared with unprotected children.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
Issue (Month): 5 (May)
Pages: 679-692

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:38:y:2010:i:5:p:679-692

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

Related research

Keywords: child labor school attendance International Labor Standards ILO Sub-Saharan Africa;

References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Hilson, Gavin, 2012. "Family Hardship and Cultural Values: Child Labor in Malian Small-Scale Gold Mining Communities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1663-1674.
  2. Webbink, Ellen & Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke, 2012. "Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 631-642.

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