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Impact of Access to Credit on Labor Allocation Patterns in Malawi

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Author Info

  • Swaminathan, Hema
  • Salcedo Du Bois, Rodrigo
  • Findeis, Jill L.

Abstract

Summary This paper uses data from the Malawi Financial Markets and Household Food Security survey to examine the impact of gendered access to credit on labor allocation patterns within the household. The paper corrects for potential endogeneity of access to credit in the estimations. Access to credit relies on the credit limit concept. Thus, an individual has access to credit from a particular source if he/she is able to borrow a positive amount from that source. Results suggest that the impact of access to credit depends upon both the gender of the recipient and whether it is formal or informal credit.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 555-566

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:38:y:2010:i:4:p:555-566

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

Related research

Keywords: access to credit bargaining off-farm work Malawi Sub-Saharan Africa women's status;

References

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  2. Zeller, Manfred & Sharma, Manohar & Ahmed, Akhter U. & Rashid, Shahidur, 2001. "Group-based financial institutions for the rural poor in Bangladesh: an institutional- and household-level analysis," Research reports 120, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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  8. David Roodman, 2009. "Estimating Fully Observed Recursive Mixed-Process Models with cmp," Working Papers 168, Center for Global Development.
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  17. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker & Omar Haider Chowdhury & Daniel L. Millimet, 2003. "Credit Programs for the Poor And the Health Status of Children in Rural Bangladesh," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(1), pages 87-118, February.
  18. Thomas, D., 1989. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Papers 586, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  19. Wodon, Quentin & Beegle, Kathleen, 2006. "Labor Shortages Despite Underemployment? Seasonality in Time Use in Malawi," MPRA Paper 11083, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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  21. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker, 1998. "The Impact of Group-Based Credit Programs on Poor Households in Bangladesh: Does the Gender of Participants Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 958-996, October.
  22. Boucher, Stephen R. & Guirkinger, Catherine & Trivelli, Carolina, 2006. "Direct Elicitation of Credit Constraints: Conceptual and Practical Issues with an Empirical Application to Peruvian Agriculture," Working Papers 6883, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  23. Doss, Cheryl R, 2001. "Is Risk Fully Pooled within the Household? Evidence from Ghana," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(1), pages 101-30, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Swamy, Vighneswara, 2014. "Financial Inclusion, Gender Dimension, and Economic Impact on Poor Households," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-15.

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