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Agricultural Technology, Risk, and Gender: A CGE Analysis of Mozambique

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  • Arndt, Channing
  • Tarp, Finn

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 28 (2000)
Issue (Month): 7 (July)
Pages: 1307-1326

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:28:y:2000:i:7:p:1307-1326

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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Arndt, Channing & Robinson, Sherman & Tarp, Finn, 1999. "Parameter estimation for a computable general equilibrium model: a maximum entropy approach," TMD discussion papers 40, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Walters, Bernard, 1995. "Engendering macroeconomics: A reconsideration of growth theory," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1869-1880, November.
  3. Hoddinott, John & Haddad, Lawrence, 1995. "Does Female Income Share Influence Household Expenditures? Evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 77-96, February.
  4. Elson, Diane, 1995. "Gender Awareness in Modeling Structural Adjustment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1851-1868, November.
  5. Palmer, Ingrid, 1995. "Public finance from a gender perspective," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1981-1986, November.
  6. Darity, William Jr., 1995. "The formal structure of a gender-segregated low-income economy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1963-1968, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Heltberg, Rasmus & Tarp, Finn, 2001. "Agricultural Supply Response and Poverty in Mozambique," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Pratt, Stephen & Blake, Adam & Swann, Peter, 2013. "Dynamic general equilibrium model with uncertainty: Uncertainty regarding the future path of the economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 429-439.
  3. Anderson, Kym, 2003. "Impact assessment of IFPRI's research and related activities based on economywide modeling," Impact assessments 21, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Fontana, Marzia & Wood, Adrian, 2000. "Modeling the Effects of Trade on Women, at Work and at Home," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1173-1190, July.
  5. Stephanie Seguino, 2008. "Gender, Distribution, and Balance of Payments (revised 10/08)," Working Papers wp133_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  6. Carr, Edward R., 2008. "Men's Crops and Women's Crops: The Importance of Gender to the Understanding of Agricultural and Development Outcomes in Ghana's Central Region," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 900-915, May.
  7. Channing Arndt & Sherman Robinson & Finn Tarp, 2006. "Trade Reform and Gender in Mozambique," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 32, pages 73-89.
  8. Arndt, Channing & Benfica, Rui M.S. & Thurlow, James, 2012. "Gender Implications of Biofuels Expansion in Africa: The Case of Mozambique," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 125395, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  9. Harris, Rebecca Lee & Robinson, Sherman, 2001. "Economy-wide effects of El NiƱo / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in Mexico and the role of improved forecasting and technological change," TMD discussion papers 83, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Filipski, Mateusz & Edward Taylor, J. & Msangi, Siwa, 2011. "Effects of Free Trade on Women and Immigrants: CAFTA and the Rural Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1862-1877.

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