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The determinants of military expenditures in developing countries

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  • Maizels, Alfred
  • Nissanke, Machiko K.
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 14 (1986)
    Issue (Month): 9 (September)
    Pages: 1125-1140

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:14:y:1986:i:9:p:1125-1140

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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    Cited by:
    1. Aamer S. Abu-Qarn & Yasmine M. Abdelfattah & J. Paul Dunne & Shadwa Zaher, 2012. "The Demand for Military Spending in Egypt," Working Papers 1210, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    2. Vincenzo Bove & Roberto Nisticò, 2014. "Coups d'état and Defense Spending: A Counterfactual Analysis," CSEF Working Papers 366, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    3. Indra de Soysa & Eric Neumayer, 2005. "Disarming Fears of Diversity: Ethnic Heterogeneity and State Militarization, 1988–2002," Public Economics 0503008, EconWPA, revised 01 Sep 2005.
    4. Lipow, Jonathan & Antinori, Camille M., 1995. "External security threats, defense expenditures, and the economic growth of less-developed countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 579-595, December.
    5. Deepak Lal, 1995. "Arms and the Man: The Costs and Benefits of Defense Expenditure," UCLA Economics Working Papers 747, UCLA Department of Economics.
    6. J. Paul Dunne & Eftychia Nikolaidou & Nikolaos Mylonidis, 2003. "The demand for military spending in the peripheral economies of Europe," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 447-460.

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