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Work and home location: Possible role of social networks

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  • Tilahun, Nebiyou
  • Levinson, David

Abstract

This research explores to what extent people's work locations are similar to that of those who live around them. Using the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics data set and the 2000 decennial census, we investigate the home and work locations of different census block residents in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis-St. Paul) metropolitan area. Our aim is to investigate if people who share a residence neighborhood also share work locations to a degree beyond what would be explained by distanhe observed patterns is the role neighborhood level and work place social networks play in locating jobs and residences respectively.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

Volume (Year): 45 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (May)
Pages: 323-331

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Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:45:y:2011:i:4:p:323-331

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Keywords: Contacts Job finding Home finding Work commute Social networks Home and work location sharing;

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References

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  1. Fontaine, Francois, 2005. "Why Are Similar Workers Paid Differently? The Role of Social Networks," IZA Discussion Papers 1786, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Antoni CALVO-ARMENGOL & Yves ZENOU, 2003. "Does crime affect unemployment? The Role of social networks," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 71-72, pages 173-188.
  3. Devine, T. J. & Kiefer, N. M., 1995. "The empirical status of job search theory," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 101-101, March.
  4. Douglas Massey & Nancy Denton, 1989. "Hypersegregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: Black and Hispanic Segregation Along Five Dimensions," Demography, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 373-391, August.
  5. William Clark, 1992. "Residential preferences and residential choices in a multiethnic context," Demography, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 451-466, August.
  6. Theo Arentze & Harry Timmermans, 2008. "Social networks, social interactions, and activity-travel behavior: a framework for microsimulation," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(6), pages 1012-1027, November.
  7. Cattell, Vicky, 2001. "Poor people, poor places, and poor health: the mediating role of social networks and social capital," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 52(10), pages 1501-1516, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Carlos Carrion & Nebiyou Tilahun & David Levinson, 2012. "Monte Carlo Simulation of Adaptive Stated Preference Survey with a case study: Effects of Aggregate Mode Shares on Individual Mode Choice," Working Papers 000110, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.

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