Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

A framework for evaluating the dynamic impacts of a congestion pricing policy for a transportation socioeconomic system

Contents:

Author Info

  • Liu, Shiyong
  • Triantis, Konstantinos P.
  • Sarangi, Sudipta

Abstract

This paper provides a modeling framework based on the system dynamics approach by which policy makers can understand the dynamic and complex nature of traffic congestion within a transportation socioeconomic system representation of a metropolitan area. This framework offers policy makers an assessment platform that focuses on the short- and long-term system behaviors arising from an area-wide congestion pricing policy along with other congestion mitigation policies. Since only a few cities in the world have implemented congestion pricing and several are about to do so, a framework that helps policy makers to understand the impacts of congestion pricing is currently quite relevant. Within this framework, improved bus and metro capacities contribute to the supply dynamics which in turn affect the travel demand of individuals and their choice of different transportation modes. Work travel and social networking activities are assumed to generate additional travel demand dynamics that are affected by travelers' perception of the level of service of the different transportation modes, their perception of the congestion level, and the associated traveling costs. It is assumed that the, population, tourism and employment growth are exogenous factors that affect demand. Furthermore, this paper builds on a previously formulated approach where fuzzy logic concepts are used to represent linguistic variables assumed to describe consumer perceptions about transportation conditions.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VG7-506P5HK-1/2/92fba3dd6cfc3f54fc4677cb5cbf914d
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

Volume (Year): 44 (2010)
Issue (Month): 8 (October)
Pages: 596-608

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:44:y:2010:i:8:p:596-608

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description

Order Information:
Postal: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/supportfaq.cws_home/regional
Web: https://shop.elsevier.com/order?id=547&ref=547_01_ooc_1&version=01

Related research

Keywords: Congestion pricing System dynamics Social networking Demand and supply dynamics Linguistic variables Traveler perceptions;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Whitehead, Tim, 2002. "Road user charging and business performance: identifying the processes of economic change," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 221-240, July.
  2. Tyrinopoulos, Yannis & Antoniou, Constantinos, 2008. "Public transit user satisfaction: Variability and policy implications," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 260-272, July.
  3. Levine, Jonathan & Garb, Yaakov, 2002. "Congestion pricing's conditional promise: promotion of accessibility or mobility?," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 179-188, July.
  4. Handy, Susan & Weston, Lisa & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "Driving by choice or necessity?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 183-203.
  5. Vickrey, William S, 1969. "Congestion Theory and Transport Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 251-60, May.
  6. Olszewski, Piotr & Xie, Litian, 2005. "Modelling the effects of road pricing on traffic in Singapore," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(7-9), pages 755-772.
  7. Arnold van Exel, Nicolaas Jacob & Rietveld, Piet, 2010. "Perceptions of public transport travel time and their effect on choice-sets among car drivers," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 2(3), pages 75-86.
  8. Golob, Thomas F., 2001. "Joint models of attitudes and behavior in evaluation of the San Diego I-15 congestion pricing project," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 495-514, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Sabounchi, Nasim S. & Triantis, Konstantinos P. & Sarangi, Sudipta & Liu, Shiyong, 2014. "Dynamic simulation modeling and policy analysis of an area-based congestion pricing scheme for a transportation socioeconomic system," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 357-383.
  2. Bar-Yosef, Asaf & Martens, Karel & Benenson, Itzhak, 2013. "A model of the vicious cycle of a bus line," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 37-50.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:44:y:2010:i:8:p:596-608. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.