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The persevering commuter - Duration of long-distance commuting

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  • Sandow, Erika
  • Westin, Kerstin
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    Abstract

    A growing number of people are long-distance commuters. For some long-distance commuting is a temporary solution, while as for others it can be a more long-term strategy to promote career and income. This study addresses duration of long-distance commuting - 30Â km or more between home and work - in Sweden, and what characterizes individuals who commute for shorter or longer periods. The effects of long-distance commuting in terms of economic outcome for both partners in a commuter household are analysed. The study is based on register data for the years 1995-2005 covering all long-distance commuters in Sweden. One finding is that previous experience of long-distance commuting makes it more likely to have a long duration of long-distance commuting. In addition economic incentives, such as a higher income, are positively correlated for continuing to long-distance commuting more than a few years. Furthermore, the analysis shows that male commuters benefit more in terms of economic outcome of long-distance commuting. It is concluded that the trend with increasing long-distance commuting can sustain not only gender differences on the labour market but also within households. Finally, the paper indicates that long-distance commuting is a strategic mobility choice for households, rather than a short-term solution for a few years.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

    Volume (Year): 44 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 6 (July)
    Pages: 433-445

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:44:y:2010:i:6:p:433-445

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    Keywords: Long-distance commuting Duration Economic outcome Households Sweden;

    References

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    1. So, Kim Sui & Orazem, Peter & Otto, Daniel, 2009. "The Effect of Housing Prices, Wages, and Commuting Time on Joint Residential and Job Location Choices," Staff General Research Papers 4050, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Jan Rouwendal, 2004. "Search Theory and Commuting Behavior," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-017/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Pazy, Asya & Salomon, Ilan & Pintzov, Tovi, 1996. "The impacts of women's careers on their commuting behavior: A case study of Israeli computer professionals," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 269-286, July.
    4. Stefan Gruber, 2010. "To Migrate or to Commute?," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 2(1), pages 110-134, January.
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    6. Wachs, Martin & Taylor, Brian D. & Levine, Ned & Ong, Paul, 1993. "The Changing Commute: A Case Study of the Jobs/Housing Relationship over Time," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7424635r, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. MURATA, Yasudada & THISSE, Jacques-François, 2005. "A simple model of economic geography à la Helpman-Tabuchi," CORE Discussion Papers 2005017, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
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    10. Anne Green, 2004. "Is Relocation Redundant? Observations on the Changing Nature and Impacts of Employment-related Geographical Mobility in the UK," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(6), pages 629-641.
    11. Kent Eliasson & Urban Lindgren & Olle Westerlund, 2003. "Geographical Labour Mobility: Migration or Commuting?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(8), pages 827-837.
    12. Mihails Hazans, 2004. "Does Commuting Reduce Wage Disparities?," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 35(3), pages 360-390.
    13. Crane, Randall, 2007. "Is There a Quiet Revolution in Women's Travel? Revisiting the Gender Gap in Commuting," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt8nj9n8nb, University of California Transportation Center.
    14. Westin, Kerstin & Sandow, Erika, 2010. "People’s preferences for commuting in sparsely populated areas: The case of Sweden," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 2(3), pages 87-107.
    15. Jos Van Ommeren & Piet Rietveld, 2003. "Compensation for commuting in imperfect urban markets," ERSA conference papers ersa03p6, European Regional Science Association.
    16. Borck, Rainald & Pflüger, Michael P. & Wrede, Matthias, 2007. "A Simple Theory of Industry Location and Residence Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 2862, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Plaut, Pnina O., 2006. "The intra-household choices regarding commuting and housing," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(7), pages 561-571, August.
    18. A. E. Green, 1997. "A Question of Compromise? Case Study Evidence on the Location and Mobility Strategies of Dual Career Households," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(7), pages 641-657.
    19. Fujita, Masahisa & Ogawa, Hideaki, 1982. "Multiple equilibria and structural transition of non-monocentric urban configurations," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 161-196, May.
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    Cited by:
    1. Shinichiro Iwata & Keiko Tamada, 2014. "The backward-bending commute times of married women with household responsibility," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 251-278, March.
    2. Erika Sandow, 2011. "Till Work Do Us Part - The Social Fallacy Of Long-Distance Commuting," ERSA conference papers ersa10p732, European Regional Science Association.

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