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Introducing multitasking to the study of travel and ICT: Examining its extent and assessing its potential importance

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  • Kenyon, Susan
  • Lyons, Glenn
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    Abstract

    Personal travel is undertaken principally as a means of access. The Internet now provides an additional form of access, enabling many activities to be reached without recourse to physical mobility by the individual undertaking the activity. However, the social and transport effects of this 'virtual mobility' are uncertain. Here, it is argued that the incidence and properties of multitasking are a necessary part of the assessment of such impacts. Participation in activities and, thus, change in activity participation will not be fully measured without consideration of multitasking. This paper presents a review, empirical evidence and discussion to support this hypothesis. Emergent from an examination of the literature and examined by new empirical evidence are three observations: (1) failure to consider multitasking leads to the underreporting of key activities; (2) misrepresentation of activity participation tends to be more pronounced for certain groups; (3) lack of awareness of multitasking could lead to flawed measurement and misrepresentation of behaviour change. Further to these observations, study findings suggest that multitasking behaviour varies according to whether the primary activity is being undertaken online or offline. Thus, the consideration of multitasking is likely to have important implications for the study of travel, Internet use and interactions between the two.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 161-175

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:41:y:2007:i:2:p:161-175

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    1. Maria Sagrario Floro & Marjorie Miles, 2003. "Time use, work and overlapping activities: evidence from Australia," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(6), pages 881-904, November.
    2. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-09 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Lyons, Glenn & Urry, John, 2005. "Travel time use in the information age," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 257-276.
    4. Chandra Bhat & Frank Koppelman, 1999. "A retrospective and prospective survey of time-use research," Transportation, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 119-139, May.
    5. Ragni Kitterød, 2001. "Does the recording of parallel activities in Time Use Diaries affect the way people report their main activities?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 145-178, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Akar, Gulsah & Clifton, Kelly J. & Doherty, Sean T., 2012. "Redefining activity types: Who participates in which leisure activity?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1194-1204.
    2. Steven Farber & Antonio Páez & Ruben Mercado & Matthew Roorda & Catherine Morency, 2011. "A time-use investigation of shopping participation in three Canadian cities: is there evidence of social exclusion?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 17-44, January.
    3. Steven Farber & Antonio Páez, 2010. "Employment status and commute distance of Canadians with disabilities," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(6), pages 931-952, November.
    4. Lyons, Glenn & Jain , Juliet & Susilo , Yusak O. & Atkins, Steve, 2013. "Comparing rail passengers’ travel time use in Great Britain between 2004 and 2010," Working papers in Transport Economics 2013:17, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
    5. Aguiléra, Anne & Guillot, Caroline & Rallet, Alain, 2012. "Mobile ICTs and physical mobility: Review and research agenda," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 664-672.
    6. Luis Miranda-Moreno & Naveen Eluru & Martin Lee-Gosselin & Tyler Kreider, 2012. "Impact of ICT access on personal activity space and greenhouse gas production: evidence from Quebec City, Canada," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(5), pages 895-918, September.
    7. Antonio Páez & Steven Farber, 2012. "Participation and desire: leisure activities among Canadian adults with disabilities," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(6), pages 1055-1078, November.
    8. Carlton Basmajian, 2010. "“Turn on the radio, bust out a song”: the experience of driving to work," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 59-84, January.

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