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Long-run effects of fetal influenza exposure: Evidence from Switzerland

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  • Neelsen, Sven
  • Stratmann, Thomas

Abstract

In this paper we estimate long-run effects of fetal exposure to the 1918/19 influenza pandemic for a European country. Using data from the 1970 Swiss census, we find that the male 1919 cohort that had a strongly increased likelihood of fetal exposure to the pandemic performs significantly worse in terms of educational attainment and has a lower chance of marriage than the surrounding cohorts. Further, we find similar results when we in addition use regional differences in influenza severity to test for the impact of influenza on later-life outcomes. A set of robustness tests confirm our findings.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 74 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 58-66

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:74:y:2012:i:1:p:58-66

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Related research

Keywords: Barker’s hypothesis; Epidemic; Fetal health; Influenza; Switzerland; Gender;

References

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  1. Douglas Almond & Bhashkar Mazumder, 2005. "The 1918 Influenza Pandemic and Subsequent Health Outcomes: An Analysis of SIPP Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 258-262, May.
  2. Elaine Kelly, 2009. "The scourge of Asian Flu: in utero exposure to pandemic influenza and the development of a cohort of British children," IFS Working Papers W09/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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Cited by:
  1. Elaine Liu & Ming-Jen Lin, 2013. "Does in Utero Exposure to Illness Matter? The 1918 Influenza Epidemic in Taiwan as a Natural Experiment," Working Papers 201310931, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
  2. Ming-Jen Lin & Elaine M. Liu, 2014. "Does in utero Exposure to Illness Matter? The 1918 Influenza Epidemic in Taiwan as a Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 20166, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Richter, André & Robling, Per Olof, 2013. "Multigenerational e ffects of the 1918-19 influenza pandemic in Sweden," Working Paper Series 5/2013, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

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