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The role of migration in the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents in the USA

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  • Ornelas, India J.
  • Perreira, Krista M.
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    Abstract

    Nearly one out of every four children in the US is a child of immigrants. Yet few studies have assessed how factors at various stages of migration contribute to the development of health problems in immigrant populations. Most focus only on post-migration factors influencing health. Using data from the Latino Adolescent Migration, Health, and Adaptation Project, this study assessed the extent to which pre-migration (e.g., major life events, high poverty), migration (e.g., unsafe and stressful migration experiences), post-migration (e.g., discrimination, neighborhood factors, family reunification, linguistic isolation), and social support factors contributed to depressive symptoms among a sample of Latino immigrant parents with children ages 12–18. Results indicated that high poverty levels prior to migration, stressful experiences during migration, as well as racial problems in the neighborhood and racial/ethnic discrimination upon settlement in the US most strongly contribute to the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents. Family reunification, social support, and familism reduce the likelihood of depressive symptoms.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953611004412
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 73 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 8 ()
    Pages: 1169-1177

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:73:y:2011:i:8:p:1169-1177

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    Related research

    Keywords: USA; Migration; Family; Latino; Hispanic; Immigrant; Depression; Acculturation;

    References

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    1. John Iceland & Melissa Scopilliti, 2008. "Immigrant residential segregation in U.S. metropolitan areas, 1990–2000," Demography, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 79-94, February.
    2. Alegria, Margarita & Shrout, Patrick E. & Woo, Meghan & Guarnaccia, Peter & Sribney, William & Vila, Doryliz & Polo, Antonio & Cao, Zhun & Mulvaney-Day, Norah & Torres, Maria & Canino, Glorisa, 2007. "Understanding differences in past year psychiatric disorders for Latinos living in the US," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 214-230, July.
    3. Lee, Min-Ah, 2009. "Neighborhood residential segregation and mental health: A multilevel analysis on Hispanic Americans in Chicago," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(11), pages 1975-1984, June.
    4. Emilio Parrado & Chenoa Flippen & Chris McQuiston, 2005. "Migration and relationship power among mexican women," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 347-372, May.
    5. William Kandel & Emilio A. Parrado, 2005. "Restructuring of the US Meat Processing Industry and New Hispanic Migrant Destinations," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 31(3), pages 447-471.
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