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Self-reported job insecurity and health in the Whitehall II study: potential explanations of the relationship

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  • Ferrie, Jane E.
  • Shipley, Martin J.
  • Newman, Katherine
  • Stansfeld, Stephen A.
  • Marmot, Michael
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the potential of demographic, personal, material and behavioural characteristics, other psychosocial features of the work environment and job satisfaction to explain associations between self-reported job insecurity and health in a longitudinal study of British white-collar civil servants. Strong associations were found between self-reported job insecurity and both poor self-rated health and minor psychiatric morbidity. After adjustment for age, employment grade and health during a prior phase of secure employment, pessimism, heightened vigilance, primary deprivation, financial security, social support and job satisfaction explained 68% of the association between job insecurity and self-rated health in women, and 36% in men. With the addition of job control, these factors explained 60% of the association between job insecurity and minor psychiatric morbidity, and just over 80% of the association with depression in both sexes.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 60 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 7 (April)
    Pages: 1593-1602

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:60:y:2005:i:7:p:1593-1602

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    Related research

    Keywords: Job insecurity Health Whitehall II study UK;

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    Cited by:
    1. Geishecker, Ingo, 2009. "Perceived job insecurity and well-being revisited: Towards conceptual clarity," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 90, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    2. Liam Delaney & Pat Wall & Fearghal O'hAodha, 2007. "Social Capital & Self-Rated Health in the Republic of Ireland. Evidence from the European Social Survey," Working Papers 200707, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    3. Geishecker, Ingo, 2012. "Simultaneity bias in the analysis of perceived job insecurity and subjective well-being," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(3), pages 319-321.
    4. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00784777 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Liam Delaney & Colm Harmon & Cecily Kelleher & Caroline Kenny, 2007. "The Determinants of Self-Rated Health in the Republic of Ireland Further Evidence and Future Directions," Working Papers 200741, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    6. Eve Caroli & Mathilde Godard, 2014. "Does Job Insecurity Deteriorate Health? A Causal Approach for Europe," PSE Working Papers hal-00784777, HAL.
    7. Ingo Geishecker, 2010. "Perceived Job Insecurity and Well-Being Revisited: Towards Conceptual Clarity," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 282, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    8. Thierry Debrand & Pascale Lengagne, 2007. "Organisation du travail et sante des seniors en Europe," Working Papers DT3, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Feb 2007.
    9. Inmaculada Silla & Nele Cuyper & Francisco Gracia & José Peiró & Hans Witte, 2009. "Job Insecurity and Well-Being: Moderation by Employability," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 10(6), pages 739-751, December.
    10. Thierry Debrand & Pascale Lengagne, 2007. "Stress at Work and the Health of Older Workers in Europe," Economie et Statistique, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, vol. 403, pages 19-38, December.
    11. Kim, Il-Ho & Muntaner, Carles & Vahid Shahidi, Faraz & Vives, Alejandra & Vanroelen, Christophe & Benach, Joan, 2012. "Welfare states, flexible employment, and health: A critical review," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 99-127.
    12. Geishecker, Ingo, 2009. "Perceived job insecurity and well-being revisited: Towards conceptual clarity," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 90, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.

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