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Socioeconomic factors, material inequalities, and perceived control in self-rated health: cross-sectional data from seven post-communist countries

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  • Bobak, Martin
  • Pikhart, Hynek
  • Rose, Richard
  • Hertzman, Clyde
  • Marmot, Michael
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    Abstract

    This study examined the association between perceived control and several socioeconomic variables and self-rated health in seven post-communist countries (Russia, Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic). Questionnaire interviews were used to collect data on self-rated health in the last 12 months, education, marital status, perceived control based on nine questions, and material deprivation based on availability of food, clothing and heating. For each population, two ecological measures of material inequalities were available: an inequality score estimated from the survey data as the distance between the 90th and 10th percentiles of material deprivation, and Gini coefficient from published sources. Data on 5330 men and women aged 20-60 were analysed. Prevalence of poor health (worse than average) varied between 8% in Czechs and 19% in Hungarians. The age-sex-adjusted odds ratio for university vs primary education was 0.36 (0.26-0.49); odds ratios per 1 standard deviation increase in perceived control and in material deprivation were 0.58 (95% CI 0.48-0.69) and 1.51 (1.40-1.63), respectively. The odds ratio for an increase in inequality equivalent to the difference between the most and the least unequal populations was 1.49 (0.88-2.52) using the material inequality score and 1.41 (0.91-2.20) using the Gini coefficient. No indication of an effect of either inequality measure was seen after adjustment for individuals' deprivation or perceived control. The results suggest that, as in western populations, education and material deprivation are strongly related to self-rated health. Perceived control appeared statistically to mediate some of the effects of material deprivation. The non-significant effects of both ecological measures of inequality were eliminated by controlling for individuals' characteristics.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 51 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 9 (November)
    Pages: 1343-1350

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:51:y:2000:i:9:p:1343-1350

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    Keywords: Eastern Europe Self-rated health Socioeconomic factors Psychosocial factors Perceived control Inequality;

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    Cited by:
    1. Costa-Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina, 2012. "Measuring inequalities in health: What do we know? What do we need to know?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 195-206.
    2. Wiktoria Wróblewska, 2010. "Stan zdrowia w Polsce - rola czynników ekonomiczno-spo³ecznych i stylu zycia.Ocena na podstawie wskaŸnika SRH i PAR," Working Papers 22, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    3. Lackó, Mária, 2010. "A magyarországi rossz egészségi állapot lehetséges magyarázó tényezői. Összehasonlító makroelemzés magyar és osztrák adatok alapján, 1960-2004
      [The poor health status of Hungarians:
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 753-778.
    4. Maria Lacko, 2011. "The Poor Health Status of the Hungarians; Comparative Macro-Analysis of the Likely Explanatory Factors on Hungarian and Austrian Data, 1960-2004," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 3, pages 1-21, September.
    5. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Masseria, Cristina, 2013. "Measuring Income-Related Inequalities in Health in Multi-Country Analysis/Midiendo las desigualdades en salud relacionadas con la renta entre países," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 455-476, Septiembr.
    6. Siddhivinayak Hirve & Johan Oud & Somnath Sambhudas & Sanjay Juvekar & Yulia Blomstedt & Stephen Tollman & Stig Wall & Nawi Ng, 2014. "Unpacking Self-Rated Health and Quality of Life in Older Adults and Elderly in India: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 105-119, May.
    7. Xuanping Zhang & Sean-Shong Hwang, 2007. "The micro consequences of macro-level social transition: how did Russians survive in the 1990s?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 82(2), pages 337-360, June.
    8. Becker, Charles M. & Urzhumova, Dina S., 2005. "Mortality recovery and stabilization in Kazakhstan, 1995-2001," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 97-122, March.
    9. Jorgenson, Andrew K. & Alekseyko, Alina & Giedraitis, Vincentas, 2014. "Energy consumption, human well-being and economic development in central and eastern European nations: A cautionary tale of sustainability," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 419-427.

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