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Over the limit: the association among health, race and debt

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Author Info

  • Drentea, Patricia
  • Lavrakas, Paul J.
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    Abstract

    This research responds to the call for more research on the conceptualization and measurement of socio-economic status that moves beyond merely considering education, occupation and income variables. Credit card usage and credit card debt is a growing phenomenon in developed countries. Using data from a 1997 representative sample of more than 900 adults in Ohio, we explored how credit card debt and stress regarding debt is associated with health. We found that both credit card debt and stress regarding debt are associated with health. In addition, health behaviors and risks explain part of this association.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VBF-3XVG7H8-6/2/e502e545b4e18372fdf3d425ba47157f
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 50 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 4 (February)
    Pages: 517-529

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:50:y:2000:i:4:p:517-529

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    Related research

    Keywords: Debt Credit Socio-economic status Race Health;

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    Cited by:
    1. Schicks, Jessica, 2014. "Over-Indebtedness in Microfinance – An Empirical Analysis of Related Factors on the Borrower Level," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 301-324.
    2. Selenko, Eva & Batinic, Bernad, 2011. "Beyond debt. A moderator analysis of the relationship between perceived financial strain and mental health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(12), pages 1725-1732.
    3. Bernadette Kamleitner & Bianca Hornung & Erich Kirchler, 2010. "Over-indebtedness and the interplay of factual and mental money management: An interview study," Working Papers 34, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
    4. Hoelzl, Erik & Pollai, Maria & Kamleitner, Bernadette, 2009. "Experience, prediction and recollection of loan burden," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 446-454, June.
    5. Irina Grafova, 2011. "Financial Strain and Smoking," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 327-340, June.
    6. Sweet, Elizabeth & Nandi, Arijit & Adam, Emma K. & McDade, Thomas W., 2013. "The high price of debt: Household financial debt and its impact on mental and physical health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 94-100.
    7. Angela Lyons & Hyungsoo Kim, 2007. "No Pain, No Strain: Impact of Health on the Financial Security of Older Americans," NFI Working Papers 2007-WP-12, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    8. Frederick J. Zimmerman & Wayne Katon, 2005. "Socioeconomic status, depression disparities, and financial strain: what lies behind the income-depression relationship?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(12), pages 1197-1215.
    9. Michael Gutter & Zeynep Copur & Selena Garrison, 2009. "Which Students Are More Likely to Experience Financial Socialization Opportunities? Exploring the Relationship between Financial Behaviors and Financial Well-Being of College Students," NFI Working Papers 2009-WP-07, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    10. Spinella, Marcello & Yang, Bijou & Lester, David, 2007. "Prefrontal systems in financial processing," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 480-489, June.

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