Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Childhood conditions that predict survival to advanced ages among African-Americans

Contents:

Author Info

  • Preston, Samuel H.
  • Hill, Mark E.
  • Drevenstedt, Greg L.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper investigates the social and economic circumstances of childhood that predict the probability of survival to age 85 among African-Americans. It uses a unique study design in which survivors are linked to their records in U.S. Censuses of 1900 and 1910. A control group of age and race-matched children is drawn from Public Use Samples for these censuses. It concludes that the factors most predictive of survival are farm background, having literate parents, and living in a two-parent household. Results support the interpretation that death risks are positively correlated over the life cycle.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VBF-3WBWYBH-D/2/a3e5bfd2189d5319342ce7082cce6e12
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 47 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 9 (November)
    Pages: 1231-1246

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:47:y:1998:i:9:p:1231-1246

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description

    Order Information:
    Postal: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/supportfaq.cws_home/regional
    Web: http://www.elsevier.com/orderme/journalorderform.cws_home/315/journalorderform1/orderooc/id=654&ref=654_01_ooc_1&version=01

    Related research

    Keywords: cohort mortality longevity African-Americans socio-economic factors geographic factors oldest old;

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Huang, Cheng & Phillips, Michael R. & Zhang, Yali & Zhang, Jingxuan & Shi, Qichang & Song, Zhiqiang & Ding, Zhijie & Pang, Shutao & Martorell, Reynaldo, 2013. "Malnutrition in early life and adult mental health: Evidence from a natural experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 259-266.
    2. Schultz, T. Paul, 2009. "Population and Health Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 4340, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Dora L. Costa & Joanna Lahey, 2003. "Becoming Oldest-Old: Evidence from Historical U.S. Data," NBER Working Papers 9933, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. L. Daniel Staetsky & Andrew Hinde, 2009. "Unusually small sex differentials in mortality of Israeli Jews: What does the structure of causes of death tell us?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(11), pages 209-252, March.
    5. Mikko Myrskylä, 2010. "The effects of shocks in early life mortality on later life expectancy and mortality compression: A cohort analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(12), pages 289-320, March.
    6. Dora L. Costa, 2004. "Race and Older Age Mortality: Evidence from Union Army Veterans," NBER Working Papers 10902, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Costa, Dora L., 2004. "Race and Pregnancy Outcomes in the Twentieth Century: A Long-Term Comparison," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, vol. 64(04), pages 1056-1086, December.
    8. Gagnon, Alain & Bohnert, Nora, 2012. "Early life socioeconomic conditions in rural areas and old-age mortality in twentieth-century Quebec," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1497-1504.
    9. Maurer, Jürgen, 2010. "Height, education and later-life cognition in Latin America and the Caribbean," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 168-176, July.
    10. Schultz, T. Paul, 2010. "Population and Health Policies," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier.
    11. Yi Zeng & James W. Vaupel, 2003. "Association of late childbearing with healthy longevity among the oldest-old in China," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-020, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:47:y:1998:i:9:p:1231-1246. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.