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Group composition and conditional cooperation

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  • Smith, Alexander
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    Abstract

    This paper examines how group composition affects conditional cooperation in public good games. Identity was created using a team-building activity and subjects were assigned to groups of six with varying proportions of subjects from two teams. Majority members contributed more to the public good than minority members. However, contributions were mainly related to beliefs about the contributions of others, especially others from the same teams, rather than minority/majority status.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535711000497
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

    Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 616-622

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:40:y:2011:i:5:p:616-622

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

    Related research

    Keywords: Public good game; Group composition; Conditional cooperation; Identity; Reciprocity;

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    Cited by:
    1. Markus Pasche, 2013. "What Can be Learned from Behavioural Economics for Environmental Policy?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2013-020, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
    2. Weng, Qian, 2013. "Session Size and its Effect on Identity Building: Evidence from a public goods experiment," Working Papers in Economics 560, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    3. Murray, Cameron K., 2012. "Markets in political influence: rent-seeking, networks and groups," MPRA Paper 42070, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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