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Culture, human agency, and economic theory: culture as a determinant of material welfare

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  • Altman, Morris

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 30 (2001)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 379-391

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:30:y:2001:i:5:p:379-391

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

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References

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  1. J. Bradford De Long, . "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: Comment," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _129, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
  2. Baumol, William J, 1986. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: What the Long-run Data Show," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1072-85, December.
  3. Akerlof, George A & Yellen, Janet L, 1990. "The Fair Wage-Effort Hypothesis and Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 105(2), pages 255-83, May.
  4. Domar, Evsey D., 1970. "The Causes of Slavery or Serfdom: A Hypothesis," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(01), pages 18-32, March.
  5. Reder, Melvin W, 1982. "Chicago Economics: Permanence and Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 1-38, March.
  6. Kochan, Thomas A., 1996. "What works at work : overview and assessment," Working papers 3886-96., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  7. Lant Pritchett, 1997. "Divergence, Big Time," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 3-17, Summer.
  8. Marshall, M G, 1998. "Scottish Economic Thought and the High Wage Economy: Hume, Smith and McCulloch on Wages and Work Motivation," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 45(3), pages 309-28, August.
  9. Baumol, William J & Wolff, Edward N, 1988. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1155-59, December.
  10. Lane, Frederic C., 1958. "Economic Consequences of Organized Violence," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(04), pages 401-417, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Finocchiaro Castro, Massimo, 2008. "Where are you from? Cultural differences in public good experiments," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2319-2329, December.
  2. Teraji, Shinji, 2009. "The economics of possible selves," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 45-51, January.
  3. Teraji, Shinji, 2008. "Culture, effort variability, and hierarchy," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 157-166, February.
  4. Swee Hoon Chuah, 2003. "Anthropology and Economic Imperialism: The Battlefield of Culture," Occasional Papers 3, Nottingham University Business School.
  5. Teraji, Shinji, 2008. "Property rights, trust, and economic performance," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1584-1596, August.
  6. Maridal, J. Haavard, 2013. "Cultural impact on national economic growth," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 136-146.

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