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On cross-currency transmissions between US dollar and euro LIBOR-OIS spreads

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  • Tamakoshi, Go
  • Hamori, Shigeyuki

Abstract

Using the causality-in-variance and causality-in-mean tests advocated by Hong (2001), we examine volatility and mean transmissions between the US dollar (USD) and euro (EUR) LIBOR-OIS spreads from January 2005 to June 2011. Interestingly, during the global financial crisis period, despite the apparently bidirectional causality-in-mean observed between the two spreads, we find evidence of significant unidirectional causality-in-variance from the EUR to the USD spread, implying information flows driven by the funding behaviors of European financial institutions. On the other hand, during the recent European sovereign debt crisis, we detect no significant causality-in-mean and causality-in-variance between the spreads.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research in International Business and Finance.

Volume (Year): 30 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 83-90

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Handle: RePEc:eee:riibaf:v:30:y:2014:i:c:p:83-90

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Related research

Keywords: Interbank money market; LIBOR-OIS spread; Cross-correlation function analysis; Volatility spillover; European sovereign debt crisis;

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  1. Tao Wu, 2011. "The U.S. Money Market and the Term Auction Facility in the Financial Crisis of 2007-–2009," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(2), pages 617-631, May.
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  4. Engle, Robert F & Ito, Takatoshi & Lin, Wen-Ling, 1990. "Meteor Showers or Heat Waves? Heteroskedastic Intra-daily Volatility in the Foreign Exchange Market," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(3), pages 525-42, May.
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  8. Ji, Philip Inyeob & In, Francis, 2010. "The impact of the global financial crisis on the cross-currency linkage of LIBOR-OIS spreads," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 575-589, December.
  9. Ross, Stephen A, 1989. " Information and Volatility: The No-Arbitrage Martingale Approach to Timing and Resolution Irrelevancy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(1), pages 1-17, March.
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  13. Go Tamakoshi & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2013. "Volatility and mean spillovers between sovereign and banking sector CDS markets: a note on the European sovereign debt crisis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 262-266, February.
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