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Skill acquisition, credit constraints, and trade

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  • Chesnokova, Tatyana
  • Krishna, Kala

Abstract

In this paper we develop a general equilibrium model where credit constraints limit the ability of agents with heterogeneous abilities and wealth to acquire skills. We identify a new effect, the induced Rybczynski effect, that works in the opposite direction from the normal supply response and may result in relative supply being downward-sloping. We analyze the effects of trade and show that under some conditions trade may reduce welfare. Finally, we study the effects of trade on income distribution and inequality.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Review of Economics & Finance.

Volume (Year): 18 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 227-238

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Handle: RePEc:eee:reveco:v:18:y:2009:i:2:p:227-238

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620165

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Keywords: Credit constraint Skill formation;

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  1. Michael P. Keane, 2002. "Financial Aid, Borrowing Constraints, and College Attendance: Evidence from Structural Estimates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 293-297, May.
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  3. Flug, Karnit & Spilimbergo, Antonio & Wachtenheim, Erik, 1998. "Investment in education: do economic volatility and credit constraints matter?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 465-481, April.
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  5. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1998. "Life Cycle Schooling and Dynamic Selection Bias: Models and Evidence for Five Cohorts of American Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(2), pages 262-333, April.
  6. Ranjan, Priya, 2003. "Trade induced convergence through human capital accumulation in credit-constrained economies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 139-162, October.
  7. Daron Acemoglu & Joern-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," Working papers 98-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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  11. Acemoglu, D. & Pischki, J.S., 1996. "Why Do Firms Train? Theory and Evidence," Working papers 96-7, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  12. Lawrence F. Katz & Claudia Goldin, 2001. "The Legacy of U.S. Educational Leadership: Notes on Distribution and Economic Growth in the 20th Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 18-23, May.
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  15. Eicher, Theo S., 1999. "Trade, development and converging growth rates: Dynamic gains from trade reconsidered," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 179-198, June.
  16. Cartiglia, Filippo, 1997. "Credit constraints and human capital accumulation in the open economy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1-2), pages 221-236, August.
  17. Ranjan, Priya, 2001. "Dynamic evolution of income distribution and credit-constrained human capital investment in open economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 329-358, December.
  18. James Malcomson & James W. Maw, 2002. "General Training by Firms, Apprentice Contracts, and Public Policy," Economics Series Working Papers 86, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  19. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-34, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Reuß, Karsten, 2008. "Age-dependent skill formation and returns to education," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 631-646, August.
  2. David Atkin, 2010. "Endogenous Skill Acquisition and Export Manufacturing in Mexico," Working Papers id:2506, eSocialSciences.
  3. Bonfatti, Roberto & Ghatak, Maitreesh, 2013. "Trade and the allocation of talent with capital market imperfections," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 187-201.
  4. Alexander Monge-Naranjo, 2012. "Foreign firms and the diffusion of knowledge," Working Papers 2012-055, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  5. Arpita Chatterjee, 2014. "Endogenous Comparative Advantage, Gains From Trade and Symmetry-Breaking," Discussion Papers 2014-18, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  6. Bonfatti, Roberto & Ghatak, Maitreesh, 2011. "Trade and the Skill Premium Puzzle with Capital Market Imperfections," CEPR Discussion Papers 8286, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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