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Navigating the impact-innovation double hurdle: The case of a climate change research fund

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  • Lettice, Fiona
  • Smart, Palie
  • Baruch, Yehuda
  • Johnson, Mark
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    Abstract

    This paper analyses how the funding for research grants was allocated from a specific research fund which aimed to support innovative research projects with the potential to have research impact by reducing carbon emissions. The fund received a total of 106 proposals, of which 27 were successful at obtaining financial support. Our aims were to test which factors influenced the funding decision and to discover whether or not and to what extent the fund met its intended objectives through the allocation of monies. The allocation process and its outcomes were analysed using correlation, logistical and linear regression to test our research hypotheses. Using this research funding process as a single study, we found that trying to clear the impact-innovation double hurdle in a single funding initiative ultimately compromises both goals. This paper therefore contributes to our understanding of innovation management within the context of carbon emission reduction and explains which factors influenced success in securing research monies through the funding process.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research Policy.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 1048-1057

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:41:y:2012:i:6:p:1048-1057

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/respol

    Related research

    Keywords: Research funding; Carbon emissions reduction; Innovation; Research impact;

    References

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