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The impact of NIH postdoctoral training grants on scientific productivity

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  • Jacob, Brian A.
  • Lefgren, Lars

Abstract

In this paper, we estimate the impact of receiving an NIH postdoctoral training grant on subsequent publications and citations. Our sample consists of all applications for NIH postdoctoral training grants (unsuccessful as well as successful) from 1980 to 2000. Both ordinary least squares and regression discontinuity estimates show that receipt of an NIH postdoctoral fellowship leads to about one additional publication over the next five years, which reflects a 20% increase in research productivity.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research Policy.

Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 (July)
Pages: 864-874

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Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:40:y:2011:i:6:p:864-874

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/respol

Related research

Keywords: Training grants NIH F32 R&D Scientific productivity;

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References

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  1. Brian A. Jacob & Lars Lefgren, 2002. "Remedial Education and Student Achievement: A Regression-Discontinuity Analysis," NBER Working Papers 8918, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule To Estimate The Effect Of Class Size On Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575, May.
  3. Sandra E. Black, 1997. "Do better schools matter? Parental valuation of elementary education," Research Paper 9729, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Ashish Arora & Alfonso Gambardella, 2010. "The Impact of NSF Support for Basic Research in Economics," NBER Chapters, in: Contributions in Memory of Zvi Griliches, pages 91-115 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Hahn, Jinyong & Todd, Petra & Van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2001. "Identification and Estimation of Treatment Effects with a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(1), pages 201-09, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Mónica Benito & Rosario Romera, 2013. "How to boost the PHD labour market? : facts from the PHD system side," Statistics and Econometrics Working Papers ws132824, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Estadística y Econometría.
  2. Jose Miguel Benavente & Gustavo Crespi & Lucas Figal Garone & Alessandro Maffioli, 2012. "The Impact of National Research Funds: A Regression Discontinuity Approach to the Chilean FONDECYT," Working Papers wp356, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  3. Bloch, Carter & Sørensen, Mads P. & Graversen, Ebbe K. & Schneider, Jesper W. & Schmidt, Evanthia Kalpazidou & Aagaard, Kaare & Mejlgaard, Niels, 2014. "Developing a methodology to assess the impact of research grant funding: A mixed methods approach," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 105-117.
  4. Lettice, Fiona & Smart, Palie & Baruch, Yehuda & Johnson, Mark, 2012. "Navigating the impact-innovation double hurdle: The case of a climate change research fund," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 1048-1057.

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