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Public goods and voting on formal sanction schemes

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Author Info

  • Putterman, Louis
  • Tyran, Jean-Robert
  • Kamei, Kenju

Abstract

The burgeoning literature on the use of sanctions to support the provision of public goods has largely neglected the use of formal or centralized sanctions. We let subjects playing a linear public goods game vote on the parameters of a formal sanction scheme capable of either resolving or exacerbating the free-rider problem, depending on parameter settings. Most groups quickly learned to choose parameters inducing efficient outcomes. We find that cooperative orientation, political attitude, gender and intelligence have a small but sometimes significant influence on voting.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 95 (2011)
Issue (Month): 9 ()
Pages: 1213-1222

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:95:y:2011:i:9:p:1213-1222

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505578

Related research

Keywords: Public good; Voluntary contribution; Formal sanction; Experiment; Penalty; Voting;

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Cited by:
  1. Duffy, Sean & Smith, John, 2012. "Cognitive load in the multi-player prisoner's dilemma game: Are there brains in games?," MPRA Paper 38825, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Dickinson, David & Masclet, David & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2014. "Norm Enforcement in Social Dilemmas: An Experiment with Police Commissioners," IZA Discussion Papers 8218, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Balafoutas, Loukas & Kocher, Martin G. & Putterman, Louis & Sutter, Matthias, 2013. "Equality, Equity and Incentives: An Experiment," Munich Reprints in Economics 18172, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  4. Chen, Chia-Ching & Chiu, I-Ming & Smith, John & Yamada, Tetsuji, 2013. "Too smart to be selfish? Measures of cognitive ability, social preferences, and consistency," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 112-122.
  5. Engelmann, Dirk & Nikiforakis, Nikos, 2013. "In the long-run we are all dead: On the benefits of peer punishment in rich environments," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79743, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  6. Dmitry Ryvkin & Anastasia Semykina, 2013. "The chicken or the egg: An experimental study of democracy survival, income, and inequality," Working Papers wp2013_12_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
  7. David L. Dickinson & Daivd Masclet & Marie Claire Villeval, 2014. "Norm Enforcement in Social Dilemmas: An Experiment with Police Commissioners," Working Papers 14-02, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  8. Sven Fischer & Kristoffel Grechenig & Nicolas Meier, 2013. "Cooperation under punishment: Imperfect information destroys it and centralizing punishment does not help," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2013_06, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
  9. Kamijo, Y. & Nihonsugi, T. & Takeuchi, A. & Funaki, Y., 2014. "Sustaining cooperation in social dilemmas: Comparison of centralized punishment institutions," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 180-195.
  10. Duffy, Sean & Smith, John, 2011. "Cognitive load in the multi-player prisoner's dilemma game," MPRA Paper 30856, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. David Dickinson & David Masclet & Marie Claire Villeval, 2014. "Norm Enforcement in Social Dilemmas. An Experiment with Police Commissioners," Working Papers halshs-00996511, HAL.
  12. Al-Ubaydli, Omar & Jones, Garett & Weel, Jaap, 2014. "Average player traits as predictors of cooperation in a repeated prisoner's dilemma," MPRA Paper 55383, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Garett Jones & Niklas Potrafke, 2014. "Human Capital and National Institutional Quality: Are TIMSS, PISA, and National Average IQ Robust Predictors?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4790, CESifo Group Munich.
  14. John Nye & Gregory Androuschak & Desiree Desierto & Garett Jones & Maria Yudkevich, 2012. "What Determines Trust? Human Capital vs. Social Institutions: Evidence from Manila and Moscow," HSE Working papers WP BRP 18/EC/2012, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  15. Allred, Sarah & Duffy, Sean & Smith, John, 2013. "Cognitive Load and Strategic Sophistication," MPRA Paper 47997, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Chen, Josie I, 2014. "Obedience to Rules with Mild Sanctions: The Roles of Peer Punishment and Voting," MPRA Paper 55364, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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