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So many rocket scientists, so few marketing clerks: Estimating the effects of economic reform on occupational mobility in Estonia

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  • Campos, Nauro F.
  • Dabusinskas, Aurelijus

Abstract

Why do workers change occupations? This paper investigates occupational mobility and its determinants following a large unexpected shock (communism's collapse in 1989.) Our calculations show that from 1989 to 1995 between 35 and 50% of Estonian workers changed occupations (classified at one- and four-digits, respectively.) Among the main determinants of occupational mobility we find firm tenure, labour market experience and returns to alternative occupations. We investigate the role of gender and ethnicity and find strong results for the former, with mobility mainly driven by push factors for males (returns to current occupations) and by pull factors for females (returns to alternative occupations).

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 25 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 261-275

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Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:25:y:2009:i:2:p:261-275

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544

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Keywords: Occupational mobility Human capital Transition economies;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Fidrmuc, Jarko & Senaj, Matus, 2012. "Human Capital, Consumption, and Housing Wealth in Transition," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62058, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  2. Raul Eamets & Jaan Masso & Pille Motsmees, 2013. "The Effect of Migration Experience on Occupational Mobility in Estonia," Discussion Papers 14, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
  3. Jaan Masso & Raul Eamets & Pille Mõtsmees, 2013. "The Effect of Temporary Migration Experience on Occupational Mobility in Estonia," CESifo Working Paper Series 4322, CESifo Group Munich.

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