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Economic growth, size of the agricultural sector, and urbanization in Africa

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  • Brückner, Markus

Abstract

This paper uses variations in international commodity prices and rainfall to construct instrumental variables estimates of the within-country effect that changes in the size of the agricultural sector and GDP per capita growth have on the urbanization rate. For a panel of 41 African countries during the period 1960–2007, the paper’s three main findings are that: (i) decreases in the share of agricultural value added lead to a significant increase in the urbanization rate; (ii) conditional on changes in the share of agricultural value added GDP per capita growth does not significantly affect the urbanization rate; (iii) increases in the urbanization rate had a significant negative average effect on GDP per capita growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 71 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 26-36

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Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:71:y:2012:i:1:p:26-36

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622905

Related research

Keywords: Economic growth; Sectoral shocks; Urbanization;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Kym Anderson & Markus Bruckner, 2012. "Distortions to Agriculture and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Departmental Working Papers 2012-06, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  2. Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay & Elliott Green, 2013. "Urbanization and Mortality Decline," Working Papers 46, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.

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